Papers in Speech Communication: Speech Production

Raymond D. Kent, Bishnu S. Atal, Joanne L. Miller, Editors

Published in 1991

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Preface

Dedication

Acknowledgments

RESPIRATION

Commentary

  • Paper l. M.H. Draper, P. Ladefoged, and D. Whitteridge (1959), Respiratory muscles in speech, Journal of Speech and Hearing Research 2, 16-27
  • Paper 2. T. Hixon, M. Goldman, and J. Mead (1973), Kinematics of the chest wall during speech production: Volume displacements of the rib cage abdomen, and lung. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research 16, 78-115
  • Paper 3. T. Hixon, J. Mead, and M. Goldman (1976), Dynamics of the chest wall during speech production: Function of the thorax, rib cage, diaphragm, and abdomen. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research 19, 297-356

    VOICE (PHONATION)

    Commentary

  • Paper 4. J. van den Berg, J.T. Zantema, and P. Doornenbal, Jr. (1957), On the air resistance and the Bernoulli effect of the human larynx. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 29, 626-631
  • Paper 5. J. van den Berg (1958), Myoelastic-aerodynamic theory of voice production. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research l, 227-244
  • Paper 6. G. Fant (1986), Glottal flow: Models and interaction. Journal of Phonetics 14, 393-399
  • Paper 7. J. Gauffin and J. Sundberg (1989), Spectral correlates of glottal voice source waveform characteristics. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research 32, 556-565
  • Paper 8. H. Hirose and T. Gay (1972), The activity of the laryngeal muscles in voicing control: An electromyographic study. Phonetica 25, 140-164
  • Paper 9. K. Ishizaka and J.L. Flanagan (1972), Synthesis of voiced sounds from a two-mass model of the vocal cords. Bell System Technical Journal 5l, 1233-1268
  • Paper 10. M. Rothenberg (1973), A new inverse-filtering technique for deriving the glottal air flow waveform during voicing. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 53, 1632-1645
  • Paper 11. I.R. Titze (1988), The physics of small-amplitude oscillation of the vocal folds. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 83, 1536-1552
  • Paper 12. I.R. Titze and D. Talkin (1979), A theoretical study of the effects of various laryngeal configurations on the acoustics of phonation. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 66, 60-74

    VOCAL TRACT AND ACOUSTIC RELATIONSHIPS

    Commentary

  • Paper 13. G. Fant (1980), The relations between area functions and the acoustic signal. Phonetica 37, 55-86
  • Paper 14. O. Fujimura (1962), Analysis of nasal consonants. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 34, 1865-1875
  • Paper 15. R. Harshman, P. Ladefoged, and L. Goldstein (1977), Factor analysis of tongue shapes. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 62, 693-707
  • Paper 16. B.E.F. Lindblom and J.E.F. Sundberg (1971), Acoustical consequences of lip, tongue, jaw, and larynx movement. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 50, 1166-1179
  • Paper 17. K.N. Stevens (1971), Airflow and turbulence noise for fricative and stop consonants: Static considerations. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 50, 1180-1192
  • Paper 18. K.N. Stevens (1989), On the quantal nature of speech. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 17, 3-45
  • Paper 19. K.N. Stevens and A.S. House (1955), Development of a quantitative description of vowel articulation. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 27, 484-493
  • Paper 20. S. Wood (1979), A radiographic analysis of constriction locations for vowels. Journal of Phonetics 7, 25-43

    ACOUSTIC CHARACTERISTICS OF SPEECH

    Commentary

  • Paper 21. T.H. Crystal and House (1990), Articulation rate and the duration of syllables and stress groups in connected speech. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 88, 101-112
  • Paper 22. G. Fant (1975), Non-uniform vowel normalization. Speech Transmission Laboratory Quarterly Progress and Status Report (Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm) 2-3, 1-19
  • Paper 23. O. Fujimura and J.Lindqvist (1971), Sweep-tone measurements of vocal-tract characteristics. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 49, 541-558
  • Paper 24. A.S. House and G. Fairbanks (1953), The influence of consonant environment upon the secondary acoustical characteristics of vowels Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 25, 105-113
  • Paper 25. D.J. Klatt (1976), Linguistic uses of segmental duration in English: Acoustic and perceptual evidence. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 59, 1208-122l
  • Paper 26. B. Lindblom (1963), Spectrographic study of vowel reduction. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 35, 1773-1781
  • Paper 27. L. Lisker and A.S. Abramson (1964), A cross-language study of voicing in initial stops: Acoustical measurements. Word 20, 384-422
  • Paper 28. S.E.G. Ohman (1966), Coarticulation in VCV utterances: Spectrographic measurements. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 39, 151-168
  • Paper 29. G. Peterson and H. Barney (1952), Control methods used in a study of the vowels. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 24, 175-184

    ARTICULATORY MOVEMENTS

    Commentary

  • Paper 30. F. Bell-Berti and K.S. Harris (1982), Temporal patterns of coarticulation: Lip rounding. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 71, 449-454
  • Paper 31. J. Folkns and J. Abbs (1975), Lip and jaw motor control during speech: Responses to resistive loading of the jaw. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research 18, 207-220
  • Paper 32. J.A.S. Kelso, E.L. Saltzman, and B. Tuller (1986), The dynamical perspective on speech production: Data and theory. Journal of Phonetics 14, 29-59
  • Paper 33. R.D. Kent and F.D. Minifie (1977), Coarticulation in recent speech production models. Journal of Phoenics, 5, 115-133
  • Paper 34. D.P. Kuehn and K.L. Moll (1976), A cineradiographic study of VC and CV articulatory velocities. Journal of Phonetics 4, 303-320
  • Paper 35. J. Lubker and T. Gay (1982), Anticipatory labial coarticulation : Experimental, biological, and linguistic variables. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 71, 437-448
  • Paper 36. P.F. MacNeilage (1970), Motor control of serial ordering of speech. Psychological Review 77, 182-196
  • Paper 37. S.E.G. Ohman (1967), Numerical model of coarticulation. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 41, 310-320
  • Paper 38. D. Ostry and K. Munhall (1985), Control of rate and duration of speech movements. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 77, 640-648
  • Paper 39. H.M. Sussman, P.F. MacNeilage, and R.J. Hanson (1973), Labial and mandibular dynamics during the production of bilabial consonants: Preliminary results. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research 16, 397-420

    SPEECH SYNTHESIS

    Commentary

  • Paper 40. D.H. Klatt (1980), Software for a cascade/parallel formant synthesizer. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 67, 971-995
  • Paper 41. D.H. Klatt and L.C. Klatt 91990), Analysis, synthesis and perception of voice quality variations among female and male talkers. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 87, 820-857
  • Paper 42. P. Mermelstein (1973), Articulatory model for the study of speech production. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 53, 1070-1082

    Index to current volume

    Table of Contents and Index to companion volume on Speech Production

    Table of Contents and Index to companion volume on Speech Perception

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    PREFACE

    Over the past few decades there has been great progress in understanding the nature of human speech production and perception, and in applying this knowledge to problems of speech processing (coding, recognition, and synthesis). Given the interdisciplinary nature of the enterprise, important papers in these areas have appeared in a wide range of journals, proceedings, and books from such diverse fields as engineering, linguistics, physics, psychology, and speech and hearing science. The current volume forms part of a three-volume series whose purpose is to bring together a number of these important papers. The series is sponsored by the Acoustical Society of America and, following the classification system of the Society's journal, one volume focuses on speech production, one on speech perception, and one on speech processing.

    The idea of the three-volume series originated within the Speech Technical Committee of the Society. The Committee discussed and enthusiastically endorsed the project at the Society's fall 1989 meeting in St. Louis, Missouri, and subsequently chose the editors and editorial boards. A formal proposal for the project was then drafted by the Chair of the Speech Technical Committee and was forwarded to the Executive Council of the Society. The Council gave final approval for the project at the Society's spring 1990 meeting in State College, Pennsylvania.

    We have organized each of the three volumes into topical sections, with the papers within each section ordered alphabetically by author. To help guide readers-especially students and nonexperts-we have written editorial commentary for each section. The commentary is intended to provide a brief context for the individual papers, placing them within the history of the discipline. We have also included a topical subject index at the end of each volume, keyed to individual papers. Finally, because the three volumes are so closely interrelated, at the end of each volume we have included the table of contents and the index of each of the other two volumes.

    We have worked closely with our editorial boards in selecting the papers that appear in these volumes. The members of the boards were involved in all stages of the selection process, from the initial generation of a list of potential papers to the final decisions on selection. In making the selections, we were guided by the goal of including papers that are important in their own right and, in addition, collectively reflect progress in the field and present a range of viewpoints, approaches, an methodologies. Given the vast literature on speech, and practical constraints on the size of the volumes, the choices were difficult, and many important papers are not included. We can only hope that the volumes, as constituted, will prove useful to the speech community as research on speech communication proceeds.

    Raymond D. Kent
    Joanne L. Miller


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    © 1998 Acoustical Society of America