Joint Meeting
150th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America/NOISE-CON 2005
17--21 October 2005
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Minneapolis Hilton Hotel

The 150th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America will be held Monday through Friday, 17–21 October 2005 at the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. NOISE-CON 2005 will be held in conjunction with the meeting, Monday through Wednesday, 17-19 October 2005. All Technical Sessions and meeting events will be held at the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel. Registration will begin Monday, 17 October, at 7:00 a.m.
  1. HOTEL INFORMATION
  2. TRANSPORTATION AND TRAVEL DIRECTIONS
  3. STUDENT TRANSPORTATION EXPENSES
  4. MESSAGES FOR ATTENDEES
  5. REGISTRATION
  6. ASSISTIVE LISTENING DEVICES
  7. TECHNICAL SESSIONS
  8. TECHNICAL SESSION DESIGNATIONS
  9. NOISE-CON 2005
  10. NOISE-CON 2005 PLENARY TALKS
  11. NOISE-CON 2005 CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS
  12. DISTINGUISHED LECTURE
  13. TOPICAL MEETING ON IMAGING HIFU-INDUCED LESIONS
  14. HOT TOPICS SESSION
  15. TUTORIAL LECTURE ON DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING IN BIOMEDICAL ULTRASOUND
  16. POWER PLANT NOISE SEMINAR
  17. SHORT COURSE ON STATISTICAL ENERGY ANALYSIS
  18. EXPOSITION
  19. EXPOSITION OPENING RECEPTION
  20. TECHNICAL TOURS
  21. CHORAL MUSIC PANEL DISCUSSION AND PERFORMANCE
  22. WORKSHOP FOR ASA JOURNAL AUTHORS AND READERS
  23. ROSSING PRIZE IN ACOUSTICS EDUCATION AND EDUCATION IN ACOUSTICS PRIZE LECTURE
  24. TECHNICAL COMMITTEE OPEN MEETINGS
  25. JOINT ASA PLENARY SESSION/INCE AWARDS SESSION
  26. ANSI STANDARDS COMMITTEES
  27. COFFEE BREAKS
  28. A/V PREVIEW ROOM
  29. ONLINE MEETING PAPERS
  30. E-MAIL ACCESS
  31. BUFFET SOCIALS
  32. FELLOWS' LUNCHEON
  33. MENTORING SESSION FOR EARLY CAREER ACOUSTICIANS
  34. STUDENTS MEET MEMBERS FOR LUNCH
  35. STUDENTS' RECEPTION
  36. COMMITTEE ON WOMEN IN ACOUSTICS LUNCHEON
  37. CHILD CARE
  38. ACCOMPANYING PERSONS' PROGRAM
  39. WEATHER
  40. TECHNICAL PROGRAM ORGANIZING COMMITTEE
  41. ORGANIZING COMMITTEES
  42. PHOTOGRAPHING AND RECORDING
  43. NOTE TO SMOKERS
  44. ABSTRACT ERRATA
  45. GUIDELINES FOR ORAL PRESENTATIONS AT MEETINGS OF THE ACOUSTICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA
  46. SUGGESTIONS FOR EFFECTIVE POSTER PRESENTATIONS
  47. GUIDELINES FOR USE OF COMPUTER PROJECTION IN MEETING PRESENTATIONS
  48. DATES OF FUTURE ASA MEETINGS

    1. HOTEL INFORMATION
    The Hilton Minneapolis Hotel (1001 Marquette Avenue, Minneapolis, MN 55403), located in the heart of downtown, is the headquarters hotel where all meeting events will be held. The cut-off date for reserving rooms at special rates is 12 September. Please make your reservation directly with the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel. (Tel.: 612-376-1000; Toll Free: 800-445-8667; Fax: 612-397-4871). When making your reservation, you must mention the Acoustical Society of America to obtain the special meeting rates of $134 USD/single or double; $169 USD/ Executive Level.

    The hotel features a fully equipped health club, indoor heated swimming pool, sauna, jacuzzi as well as a full service business center. For more details visit:
    www.hilton.com/en/hi/hotels/index.jhtml?ctyhocn=MSPMHHH

    2. TRANSPORTATION AND TRAVEL DIRECTIONS
    Minneapolis is served by the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport (Airport Code MSP). A number of airlines serve Minneapolis including Northwest, SunCountry, and many others. Most flights arrive at the Lindbergh (main) terminal; SunCountry, Midwest and other charter flights arrive at the smaller Humphrey terminal. Transportation between terminals is free and convenient. For flight information, visit www.mspairport.com.
    There are several options for traveling from Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport to downtown Minneapolis (click here for map of downtown in pdf format): Ground Transportation Information. The Tram Level information booth is staffed seven days a week from 7 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Staff provides information, maps, directions and other assistance to travelers. Travelers may also obtain wheelchairs from the information booth.
    Light Rail Service at MSP. Light rail service to and from the airport is now available. The light rail stop closest to the hotel is the Nicollet Mall stop. Exit the train at 5th and Marquette and walk to the hotel 5 blocks south, at 10th and Marquette. Alternatively, use your Light Rail ticket to take a bus on Nicollet Mall to Marquette. Trains stop at both the Lindbergh and Humphrey terminals and connect travelers to 15 other destinations, including downtown Minneapolis to the north and the Mall of America to the south. Trains run between the terminals every 7 to 8 minutes during peak hours and every 10 to 15 minutes at other times of the day. There is no charge for light rail travel between Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport's two terminals. Fares for travel to other locations from the airport are $1.75 during rush hours (Monday through Friday, 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.) and $1.25 at other times. A six-hour pass is available for $3 and an unlimited-ride day pass for $6. Tickets are sold at vending kiosks at the rail stations. For more information, visit the Metropolitan Council's Web site, www.metrotransit.org/rail or pick up a Light Rail map at the information desk at the airport. The Lindbergh Terminal Light Rail station entrance is located near the Transit Center, between the Blue and Red Parking ramps. From the Lindbergh Terminal tram level, (two floors below the Ticketing Lobby), take the automated Hub Tram toward the Transit Center. When you exit the tram, follow the signs to the light rail station, located 70 feet underground. The Humphrey Terminal Light Rail station is located outside of the terminal building. A covered walkway connects the station located at 34th Avenue and 72nd Street, to the Humphrey parking facility, and to the terminal building.
    Major car rental companies. Rental car companies have phones and touch screen information kiosks at the Lindbergh Terminal on the Baggage Claim Level opposite baggage carousels 2, 5 and 10. The rental car counters are located in the Hub building located between the Blue and Red parking ramps, on Levels 1-3. Passengers can take the underground tram to go between the Lindbergh Terminal and the Hub building.
    Parking at Hilton Minneapolis. The hotel self-parking rate is $12 per day; valet parking rate is $20 per day.
    SuperShuttle shared-ride, door-to-door service. Travelers wishing to take a van to the hotel can gain access to those services through the Lindbergh Terminal's Tram Level. The cost is about $15.
    Bus service. Metro Transit provides bus service to the Metropolitan Twin Cities area. Buses are accessible at the airport's new Transit Center. You can reach the Transit Center from the Red and Blue parking ramps or by taking the Hub Tram from the Lindbergh Terminal's Tram Level. For a complete list of shuttle companies, visit http://www.mspairport.com/MSP/Travelers_Guide/.
    Taxicabs and limousines. Taxis are available at the Lindbergh and Humphrey Terminals. Taxi service at the Lindbergh Terminal is accessible via the Tram Level. Signs direct passengers one level up to the cab starter booth, where airport staff will assist passengers obtaining a taxi. At the Humphrey Terminal, taxi service is available at the Humphrey Ground Transportation Center which is located in the Humphrey Parking ramp on Level 1.
    Downtown Minneapolis is approximately 16 miles from the airport, with fares averaging $25.00. All taxi fares are metered and include a $2.25 trip fee which allows drivers to recoup airport permit fees.

    3. STUDENT TRANSPORTATION SUBSIDIES
    A student transportation subsidies fund has been established to provide limited funds to students to partially defray transportation expenses to meetings. Students presenting papers who propose to travel in groups using economical ground transportation will be given first priority to receive subsidies, although these conditions are not mandatory. No reimbursement is intended for the cost of food or housing. The amount granted each student depends on the number of requests received. To apply for a subsidy, submit a proposal (e-mail preferred) to be received by 12 September to: Jolene Ehl, ASA, Suite 1NO1, 2 Huntington Quadrangle, Melville, NY 11747-4502, Tel: 516-576-2359, Fax: 516-576-2377, E-mail: jehl@aip.org. The proposal should include your status as a student; whether you have submitted an abstract; whether you are a member of ASA; method of travel; if traveling by auto; whether you will travel alone or with other students; names of those traveling with you; and approximate cost of transportation.

    4. MESSAGES FOR ATTENDEES
    Messages for attendees may be left by calling the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel 612-376-1000 and asking for the ASA Registration Desk during the meeting, where a message board will be located. This board may also be used by attendees who wish to contact one another.

    5. REGISTRATION
    Registration is required for all attendees and accompanying persons. Only persons with registration badges will be admitted to the meeting rooms, Buffet Socials on Tuesday and Thursday, and the Accompanying Persons Program.

    You may register
    online or download a registration form to be returned by fax or postal mail.

    Registration will be held on Sunday evening, 16 October, between 3:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. in the Grand Ballroom preconvene area of the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel. On Sunday only those registrants who have preregistered may pick up their registration materials. No on-site registration facilities will be available on Sunday. Full registration will open on Monday, 17 October, at 7:00 a.m.

    Checks or travelers checks in U.S. funds drawn on U.S. banks and Visa, MasterCard and American Express credit cards will be accepted for payment of registration. Meeting attendees who have preregistered may pick up their badges and registration materials at the Preregistration Desk.

    The registration fees are (in USD) $375 for members of the Acoustical Society of America and the Institute of Noise Control Engineering; $425 for non-members, $50 for Emeritus members (Emeritus status pre-approved by ASA or INCE), $40 for students who are not members of ASA or INCE and $50 for accompanying persons. One-day registration is available at $190 for members and $215 for nonmembers. A nonmember who pays the $425 nonmember registration fee and simultaneously applies for Associate Membership in the Acoustical Society of America will be given a $50 discount off their dues payment for 2006 dues.

    Invited speakers who are members of the Acoustical Society of America or the Institute of Noise Control Engineering are expected to pay the registration fee, but nonmember invited speakers who participate in the meeting may register without charge. There is no registration fee for students with current student identification cards who are members of the Acoustical Society of America or the Institute of Noise Control Engineering. Special note to students who preregistered Online: You will also be required to show your student id card when picking-up your registration materials at the meeting.

    6. ASSISTIVE LISTENING DEVICES
    The ASA has purchased assistive listening devices (ALDs) for the benefit of meeting attendees who need them at technical sessions. Attendees with hearing loss are encouraged to take advantage of ALDs. To do so, ask at the ASA registration desk. If you have problems with an ALD return to the desk for help. Any attendee who will require an assistive listening device should advise the Society in advance of the meeting by writing to: Acoustical Society of America, Suite 1NO1, 2 Huntington Quadrangle, Melville, NY 11747-4502; Email:
    asa@aip.org.

    7. TECHNICAL SESSIONS
    The technical program includes 107 sessions, with 779 papers scheduled for presentation during the meeting.

    A floor plan of the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel appears in the printed program. Session Chairs have been instructed to adhere strictly to the printed time schedule, both to be fair to all speakers and to permit attendees to schedule moving from one session to another to hear specific papers. If an author is not present to deliver a lecture-style paper, the Session Chairs have been instructed either to call for additional discussion of papers already given or to declare a short recess so that subsequent papers are not given ahead of the designated times.

    Several sessions are scheduled in poster format, with the display times indicated in the program schedule.

    8. TECHNICAL SESSION DESIGNATIONS
    The first character is a number indicating the day the session will be held, as follows:
    1-Monday, 17 October
    2-Tuesday, 18 October
    3-Wednesday, 19 October
    4-Thursday, 20 October
    5-Friday, 21 October

    The second character is a lower case ‘‘a'' for a.m.,‘‘p'' for p.m. or ‘‘e'' for evening corresponding to the time of day the session will take place. The third and fourth characters are capital letters indicating the primary organizer of the session (either an ASA Technical Committee or INCE) using the following abbreviations or codes:
    AA - Architectural Acoustics
    AB - Animal Bioacoustics
    AO - Acoustical Oceanography
    BB - Biomedical Ultrasound/Bioresponse to Vibration
    EA - Engineering Acoustics
    ED - Education in Acoustics
    ID - Interdisciplinary
    MU - Musical Acoustics
    NC - NOISE-CON
    NS - Noise
    PA - Physical Acoustics
    PP - Psychological and Physiological Acoustics
    SA - Structural Acoustics and Vibration
    SC - Speech Communication
    SP - Signal Processing in Acoustics
    UW - Underwater Acoustics

    In sessions where the same group is the primary organizer of more than one session scheduled in the same morning or afternoon, a fifth character, either lower-case ‘‘a,'' ‘‘b," or "c" is used to distinguish the sessions. Each paper within a session is identified by a paper number following the session-designating characters, in conventional manner. As hypothetical examples: paper 2pEA3 would be the third paper in a session on Tuesday afternoon organized by the Engineering Acoustics Technical Committee; 3pSAb5 would be the fifth paper in the second of two sessions on Wednesday afternoon sponsored by the Structural Acoustics and Vibration Technical Committee.

    Note that technical sessions are listed both in the calendar and the body of the program in the numerical and alphabetical order of the session designations rather than the order of their starting times. For example, session 3aAA would be listed ahead of session 3aAO even if the latter session began earlier in the same morning.

    9. NOISE-CON 2005
    The 21st annual conference of the Institute of Noise Control Engineering,
    NOISE-CON 2005, will run concurrently with the 150th Meeting of the Acoustical Society on Monday through Wednesday (17-19 October, 2005), culminating with the Closing Ceremony which will take place with the ASA Plenary Session on Wednesday afternoon, 19 October.

    10. NOISE-CON 2005 PLENARY TALKS
    Carl Burleson of the Federal Aviation Administration will present a plenary talk titled "Perspectives on noise in the menu of environmental issues, and the role of technical solutions relative to policy approaches" on Monday, 17 October, at 8:15 a.m. in Session 1aNCa in Salons B and C.

    Paul Donavan of Illingworth-Rodkin will present a plenary talk titled "Reducing traffic noise with quieter pavements" on Tuesday, 18 October, at 8:15 a.m. in Session 2aNCa in Salons B and C.

    James West of The Johns Hopkins University will present a plenary talk titled "What do we know about noise in hospitals"on Wednesday, 19 October, at 8:15 a.m. in Session 3aNCa in Salons B and C.

    11. NOISE-CON 2005 CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS
    The Proceedings of NOISE-CON 2005 will be published on a CD-ROM, and will be available at the conference. The CD-ROM will contain additional NOISE-CON proceedings for the years 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2003 and 2004. The CD-ROM will be available at the conference for $30 USD, and will be available after the conference through the INCE/USA page at the Atlas Bookstore for $70 USD. To obtain a list of proceedings and other publications available now, go to www.atlasbooks.com/mktplc/00726.htm.

    12. DISTINGUISHED LECTURE
    The technical Committee on Architectural Acoustics will sponsor a distinguished lecture presented by Manfred R. Schroeder titled "From Philharmonic Hall to number theory: The way to more diffusion" on Thursday, 20 October, at 2:00 p.m. in Session 4pAAa in Salon C.

    13. TOPICAL MEETING ON IMAGING HIFU-INDUCED LESIONS
    A one-day colloquium and discussion on the topic "Imaging and Control of HIFU-Induced Lesions, sponsored by the Technical Committee on Biomedical Ultrasound/Bioresponse to Vibration, will be held on Tuesday, 18 October, at 8:15 a.m. in Session 2aBB in the Carver Room.

    14. HOT TOPICS SESSION
    A Hot Topics session will be held on Wednesday, 19 October, at 2:00 p.m. in Session 3pID in the Carver and Hennepin Rooms and will end before the start of the Plenary Session. Papers will be presented on current topics in the fields of Biomedical Ultrasound/Bioresponse to Vibration, Engineering Acoustics, and Signal Processing in Acoustics.

    15. TUTORIAL LECTURE ON DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING IN BIOMEDICAL ULTRASOUND
    A tutorial lecture on Diagnostic Imaging in Biomedical Ultrasound will be given by E. Carr Everbach of Swarthmore College on Monday, 17 October, at 7:00 p.m. in Salon E.

    A registration fee of $25 is charged to defray partially the lecture expenses. Students with current Ids may register for $12. Only those who have pre-registered in advance of the meeting are assured of receiving copies of the lecture notes at the meeting. You may register
    online or download a registration form to be returned by fax or postal mail.

    16. POWER PLANT NOISE SEMINAR
    A seminar on Power Plant Noise will be given by Frank Brittain on Sunday, 16 October, from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. in Directors Row 1. The seminar will review the basics of noise control for combustion turbine power plants–both simple and combined cycle. The major noise sources will be identified, and proven controls will be discussed. A brief description of how power plants and their equipment work will also be included. This seminar is intended for noise control engineers who have either very limited experience with power plants, or are involved with supplying equipment for power plants.

    For registration details contact the INCE business office: ibo@inceusa.org For more information on the seminar content contact: Frank Brittain, fnbritta@bechtel.com

    17. SHORT COURSE ON STATISTICAL ENERGY ANALYSIS
    A short course on Statistical Energy Analysis will be given on Sunday, 16 October from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Monday, 17 October, from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. in the Carver Room.

    Predicting the transmission of noise and vibration through practical structures of engineering interest, across broad frequency rangeS, presents a number of challenges to an analyst. Such problems led to the development of Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA). Today SEA is used routinely in virtually every industry for which noise and vibration are of concern. Applications include: the prediction of automobile and aircraft interior noise, the design of poro-elastic "sound packages" and noise control treatments, the specification of dynamic environments for launch vehicles and satellites, the design of quiet consumer appliances and the acoustic design of ships, submarines and buildings.

    The objective of this course is to provide an overview of modern predictive SEA methods. The instructor is Phil Shorter, ESI US R&D, who has primary responsibility for the maintenance and development of the theory implemented in the commercial SEA code, AutoSEA2. The registration fee is $300.00 and covers attendance, instructional materials and coffee breaks. On site registration at the meeting will be on a space-available basis. Preregistration is encouraged since copies of notes for on-site registrants cannot be guaranteed.

    You may register
    online or download a registration form to be returned by fax or postal mail.

    18. EXPOSITION
    The meeting will be highlighted by a large exposition, jointly sponsored by the ASA and INCE. It will feature over 40 displays with instruments, materials, and services for the acoustical and vibration community. The exposition, which will be held in Salon D of the Grand Ballroom at the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel, is conveniently located near the registration area and meeting rooms. The exposition will open with a reception on Monday evening, 17 October, and will close Wednesday at noon. Morning and afternoon refreshments, will be available in the exposition area.

    The exposition will include computer-based instrumentation, sound level meters, sound intensity systems, signal processing systems, devices for noise control, sound prediction software, acoustical materials, passive and active noise control systems and other exhibits on vibrations and acoustics. For further information, please contact Richard J. Peppin, Exposition Manager, Institute of Noise Control Engineering, c/o Scantek, Inc., 7060 Oakland Mills Road, #L, Columbia, MD 21046, (T) 410-290-7726, (F) 410-290-9167, peppinr@scantekinc.com

    19. EXPOSITION OPENING RECEPTION
    A reception will be held in Salon D, 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Monday evening, 17 October, in conjunction with the opening of the exhibition. Registration badges are required for entry. One free drink ticket will be provided to each registrant. This event will provide opportunities to view the exhibits and to socialize with friends and colleagues.

    20. TECHNICAL TOURS
    A tour of the Aero Systems Engineering (ASE) Fluidyne lab is planned for Monday, October 17. A bus will pick up participants in the morning at approximately 9:00 a.m. and return in time for the afternoon sessions. A box lunch will be provided during the return bus ride. There will be approximately 45 available spots on the bus, and there will be a $5 charge to cover the box lunch (Aero Systems Engineering is subsidizing the lunch and transportation). For more information about ASE, visit
    www.aerosysengr.com.

    ASA and INCE members are also invited to a rehearsal of the famed Minnesota Orchestra (Osmo Vanska, conductor) on Tuesday afternoon, 18 October. The rehearsal will begin at 1:30 p.m. and will last until about 3:30 p.m. After the rehearsal the group will be treated to a chat with Osmo Vanska and a guided tour of Orchestra Hall with Cyril Harris as our tour guide. The Minnesota Orchestra is across the street from the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel

    You may register for these tours online or download a registration form to be returned by fax or postal mail.

    At the meeting, please sign up at the registration desk for these tours.

    21. CHORAL MUSIC PANEL DISCUSSION AND PERFORMANCE
    The second half of session 4pMU on Acoustics of Choir Singing will we held at the Central Lutheran Church and will end with a short concert by the
    St. Olaf Cantorei from St. Olaf College in Northfield, MN. The 90-voice liturgical choir, directed by Anton Armstrong and John Ferguson, will be accompanied by organ, brass quartet, handbells, and percussion. The performance at Central Lutheran Church, which is also open to the public, will feature a hymnsing in which the audience will be invited to participate.

    Central Lutheran Church (333 South 12th Street)is just a short walk from the Hilton. The performance will be preceded by a panel discussion on "Acoustical issues relevant to choral singing" with Drs. Armstrong and Ferguson and the ASA session organizers.

    22. WORKSHOP FOR ASA JOURNAL AUTHORS AND READERS
    The American Institute of Physics (AIP) will hold a two-hour workshop on Thusday, 20 October, at 9:00 a.m. in Conrad B. Electronic services provided for ASA journal authors and readers will be described including information on Peer Xpress for submitting manuscripts to The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America (JASA) and Acoustics Research Letters Online (ARLO), multimedia, Scitation searching and other online services.

    23. ROSSING PRIZE IN ACOUSTICS EDUCATION AND THE EDUCATION IN ACOUSTICS PRIZE LECTURE
    The 2005 Rossing Prize in Acoustics Education will be awarded to Katherine S. Harris, City University of New York Graduate Program, at the Plenary Session on Wednesday, 19 October.

    Katherine Harris will present the Acoustics Education Prize Lecture titled "Speech neglect: A strange educational blind spot" on Tuesday, 18 October, at 1:30 p.m. in Session 2pEDa in Conrad C.

    24. TECHNICAL COMMITTEE OPEN MEETINGS
    Technical Committees of the Acoustical Society of America will hold open meetings on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday evenings at the Hilton. These are working, collegial meetings. Much of the work of the Society is accomplished by actions that originate and are taken in these meetings including proposals for special sessions, workshops and technical initiatives. All meeting participants are cordially invited to attend these meetings and to participate actively in the discussions. Times and rooms for each Committee meeting are given in the
    schedule of committee meetings.

    25. JOINT ASA PLENARY SESSION/INCE AWARDS SESSION
    A plenary session will be held Wednesday, 19 October, at 3:30 p.m. in Salons A, B, C. The Pioneers of Underwater Acoustics Medal will be presented to Henrik Schmidt, the Silver Medal in Animal Bioacoustics will be presented to James A. Simmons, the Silver Medal in Speech Communication will be presented to Katherine S. Harris, and the Trent-Crede Medal will be presented to Jerry H. Ginsberg.

    Science Writing Awards for Journalists will be presented to Declan Butler and Kate Ramsayer.

    Certificates will be presented to the Fellows elected at the Vancouver meeting of the Society.

    INCE will grant the following awards:
    The $5000 Martin Hirschorn IAC prize which is given to contribute to the education of a graduate student studying noise control engineering in the United States who proposes a project related to an application of noise control engineering and/or acoustical conditioning of architectural spaces.

    The Student Paper Prize is given to students presenting papers relating to noise control. INCE will give up to five Student Paper Prizes of $1000 each.

    26. ANSI STANDARDS COMMITTEES
    Meetings of ANSI Accredited Standards Committees will not be held at this meeting. Standards advisory working groups will be held at the dates and times listed in the
    schedule of standards committee meetings.

    People interested in attending and becoming involved in working group activities must contact the ASA Standards Manager for further information about these groups, or about the ASA Standards Program in general, at the following address: Susan Blaeser, ASA Standards Manager, Standards Secretariat, Acoustical Society of America, Suite 114E, 35 Pinelawn Road, Melville, NY 11747, Tel: 631-390-0215 ; Fax: 631-390-0217; Email: asastds@aip.org.

    27. COFFEE BREAKS
    Morning coffee breaks will be held each day starting at 10:00 a.m. and an afternoon break will be held on Tuesday only at 2:00 p.m. On Monday, Thursday and Friday the breaks will be held in the Grand Ballroom preconvene area.

    On Tuesday and Wednesday, during the exhibition, morning coffee breaks will be held in Salon D and on Tuesday the afternoon break will be held in Salon D.

    28. A/V PREVIEW ROOM
    Boardroom 1 will be set up as an A/V preview room for authors' convenience, and will be available on Sunday from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m., Monday through Thursday from 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Friday from 7:00 a.m. to11:00 a.m.

    29. ONLINE MEETING PAPERS
    The ASA has replaced its traditional at-meeting "Paper Copying Service" with a new online site which can be found at
    http://scitation.aip.org/asameetingpapers. Authors of papers to be presented at meetings will be able to post their full papers or presentation materials for others who are interested in obtaining detailed information about meeting presentations. Submission procedures and password information have been mailed to authors with the acceptance notices.

    Those interested in obtaining copies of submitted papers for this meeting and the immediate past meeting may access the service at anytime. No password is needed.

    30. E-MAIL ACCESS
    Computers providing e-mail access will be available in Boardroom 2 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday to Thursday and 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon on Friday. The email room will provide several desktop computers as well as connections for attendees' laptop computers. The complimentary wireless email access will be provided in all guest rooms.

    31. BUFFET SOCIALS
    Complimentary buffet socials with cash bar will be held on Tuesday, 18 October, and Thursday, 20 October, from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the Grand Ballroom at the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel.

    32. FELLOWS' LUNCHEON
    A Fellows' Luncheon will be held on Thursday, 20 October, at 12:00 noon in Salon A. The speaker will be
    Mildred Dresselhaus, MIT professor, Chair of the Board of the American Institute of Physics and recent winner of the Heinz Award for Technology.

    The luncheon is open to all members and their guests. To guarantee a reservation, please purchase your tickets by Wednesday morning at 10:00 a.m. The cost is $30.00 per ticket. After that time tickets will be limited.

    Purchase tickets online or download a registration form to be returned by fax or postal mail.

    33. MENTORING SESSION FOR EARLY CAREER ACOUSTICIANS
    The Women in Acoustics (WIA) Committee, in conjunction with the Student Council, will be offering an informal mentoring session for early career acousticians. Roundtable discussions will be led by WIA members on topics such as: early academic careers, balancing family and career, interviewing for jobs, and finding/handling postdoctoral research positions. Anyone is welcome to join us for these mentoring sessions. The session will be held immediately following the plenary, from approximately 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. in the Nicollet Room. We will adjourn at 6:30 p.m. so that students can proceed immediately to the student reception.

    34. STUDENTS MEET MEMBERS FOR LUNCH
    The ASA Education Committee provides a way for a student to meet one-on-one with a member of the Acoustical Society over lunch. The purpose is to make it easier for students to meet and interact with members at ASA Meetings. Each lunch pairing is arranged separately. Students who wish to participate should contact David Blackstock, University of Texas at Austin, through email dtb@mail.utexas.edu or telephone 512-343-8248 (alternative number 512-835-3374). Please give Dr. Blackstock your name, university, department, degree you are seeking (BS, MS, or PhD), research field, acoustical interests, and days you are free for lunch. The sign-up deadline is ten days before the start of the Meeting, but an earlier sign-up is strongly encouraged. Each participant pays for his/her own meal.

    35. STUDENTS' RECEPTION
    This reception, sponsored by the Acoustical Society of America and the National Council of Acoustical Consultants, will provide an opportunity for students to meet informally with fellow students and other members of the Acoustical Society. All students are encouraged to attend, especially students who are first time attendees or those from smaller universities. The reception will be held on Wednesday, 19 October, from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in Carver's Restaurant on the first floor of the Hilton.

    Students will find in their conference registration envelopes a small sticker to place on their name tags identifying them as students. Although wearing the sticker is not mandatory, it will allow for easier networking between students and other meeting attendees.

    Students are encouraged to refer to the student guide, also found in their envelopes, for important program and meeting information pertaining only to students attending the ASA meeting. They are also encouraged to visit the official ASA Student Home Page at
    www.acosoc.org/student to learn more about student involvement in ASA.

    36. COMMITTEE ON WOMEN IN ACOUSTICS LUNCHEON
    The Women in Acoustics luncheon will be held at 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday, 19 October, in Carver's Restaurant on the first floor of the Hilton. Those who wish to attend must purchase their tickets in advance by 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday. The fee is $20 for non-students and $5 for students.

    Purchase tickets
    online or download a registration form to be returned by fax or postal mail.

    37. CHILD CARE
    Meeting attendees who are interested in arranging child care services during the meeting should contact Nanny Professionals at 651-221-0587, www.nannyprofessionals.com in advance of the meeting. The hotel's meeting and convention services has previous experience working with this agency.

    38. ACCOMPANYING PERSONS' PROGRAM<
    Spouses and other visitors are welcome at the Minneapolis meeting. The registration fee for accompanying persons is $50. A hospitality room for accompanying persons will be open in Carver's Restaurant on the first floor at the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. each morning throughout the meeting where information about activities in and around Minneapolis will be provided.

    Minneapolis and the Twin Cities area is well known as an important diverse cultural center, offering outstanding arts programs including opera, museums and theater. A few of these are highlighted here. Other guides to area attractions will be available on site. Downtown Minneapolis (click here for map in pdf format) is home to several areas of interest for visitors. All are within walking distance of the meeting. The Central Business District, downtown's business core, is the heart of the dining and shopping scene. Nicollet Mall – a pedestrian-only thoroughfare – is lined with great restaurants, plus numerous upscale shops and department stores. The Warehouse District is the center of Minneapolis nightlife. This large area of renovated warehouses is home to bars, clubs, alternative theaters, art galleries and more. The Riverfront District is where Minneapolis got its start. In the Mississippi Riverfront District, attendees can stroll cobblestone streets, dine at a century-old pub, visit historical attractions and squeeze in some trendy nightlife at the same time. The Theatre District is packed with broadway shows, music venues and upscale dining. It's also home to some of Minneapolis' most recognizable productions, along with locally-produced gems.

    The Guthrie Theater is the area's premier theater, and is easily accessible from the Hilton Hotel. Theater offerings for 17-21 October include Lynn Nottage's "Intimate Apparel" and "Freezing Paradise: An evening with Kevin Kling." Backstage tours are available Wednesday and Saturady mornings at 10:00 a.m. Details can be found at www.guthiretheater.org.

    The world-famous Walker Art Center is one of the most celebrated art museums in the country, and is known for commissioning and presenting innovative contemporary art. A new 17-acre urban campus opened to wide acclaim in spring 2005. The design for the new Walker engages the surrounding neighborhood with a new four-acre park as well as vistas onto the downtown Minneapolis skyline. The expanded facility will feature new galleries; education areas; a 385-seat theater; street-level and roof-top terraces; plazas, gardens, and lounges; and increased services and amenities for visitors. Wolfgang Puck's new Walker restaurant, 20.21, has received strong reviews. The Minneapolis Sculpture Garden, a project of the Walker Art Center and the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board, is adjacent to the museum. For more information, visit www.walkerart.org.

    The Mall of America is one of a kind. It is the Nation's largest retail and entertainment complex. The 11.6-mile Hiawatha Corridor Light Rail Transit links three of the region's most popular destinations, Downtown Minneapolis, Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport and Mall of America. Passengers arrive and depart at the newly remodeled Transit Station under the Mall at 24th Avenue. For more information, visit www.mallofamerica.com.

    39. WEATHER
    October is one of the most beautiful months in Minneapolis, when the air begins to get crisp. Enjoy fall colors and outdoor activities by packing a windbreaker, umbrella, and hat. A walk along Riverfront District should provide a glimpse of fall color. Even if the worst happens and winter arrives early, most attractions in downtown Minneapolis are accessible through the indoor skyway system. Average high temperatures in mid-October hover a bit below 60 degrees, with average lows around 40 degrees F. For additional information on Twin Cities weather, visit:
    climate.umn.edu/doc/twin_cities/twin_cities.htm

    40. TECHNICAL PROGRAM ORGANIZING COMMITTEE
    Neal F. Viemeister, Chair; James F. Lynch, T. Martin Siderius, Acoustical Oceanography; Michael J. Ferragamo, Animal Bioacoustics; David Braslau, Bruce C. Olson, Architectural Acoustics; Emad S. Ebbini, Biomedical Ultrasound/Bioresponse to Vibration; Ian M. Lindevald, Education in Acoustics and Musical Acoustics; Stephen C. Thompson, Engineering Acoustics; Michael R. Stinson, Noise; J. Stuart Bolton, Patricia Davies, NOISE-CON 2005; James P. Chambers, Physical Acoustics; Magdalena Wojtczak, Psychological and Physiological Acoustics; David M. Fromm, Charles F. Gaumond, Signal Processing in Acoustics; Arlene E. Carney, Benjamin R. Munson, Speech Communication; Courtney B. Burroughs, Structural Acoustics and Vibration; Dezhang Chu, David R. Dowling, Underwater Acoustics; Julie Golias, TPOM Assistant.

    41. ORGANIZING COMMITTEES
    Minneapolis Local Committee
    Peggy B. Nelson, General Chair; Neal F. Viemeister, Technical Program Chair; Kay Hatlestad, Food Service/Social Events; Bruce Olson, Audio-Visual; David Braslau, Accompanying Persons Program/Technical Tours; Derrick Knight and Benjamin Munson, Signs/Publicity

    NOISE-CON 2005 Committee
    Daniel J. Kato, General Chair; Robert J. Bernhard, Co-Chair; Patricia Davies and J. Stuart Bolton, Technical Program Co-Chairs; Richard J. Peppin, Exhibition Manager.

    42. PHOTOGRAPHING AND RECORDING
    Photographing and recording during regular sessions are not permitted without prior permission from the Acoustical Society.

    43. NOTE TO SMOKERS
    Smoking is prohibited indoors.

    44. ABSTRACT ERRATA
    This meeting program is Part 2 of the September 2005 issue of The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. Corrections, for printer's errors only, may be submitted for publication in the Errata section of the Journal.

    45. GUIDELINES FOR ORAL PRESENTATIONS AT MEETINGS OF THE ACOUSTICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA
    A. Preparation of Visual Aids
    1. See the guidelines for computer projection below.
    2. Allow at least one minute of your talk for each slide or other visual aid, e.g., no more than 12 slides for a 15-minute talk.
    3. Minimize the number of lines of text and the number of curves shown on one visual aid. More than 12 lines of text or 5 curves are too many to be comprehended within one minute. Too little is better than too much.
    4. On a transparency for overhead projection, all material should be within an 8x9-inch (20x23 cm) frame. Characters should be at least 0.2 inches (5 mm) high to be legible when projected; conventional 10- or 12-font characters are too small.
    5. Text for 35-mm slides may be prepared using 10- or 12-pitch font, but the overall frame size of the typed material before reproduction should be no larger than 4x6 inches (10x15 cm). In general, characters in any visual aid should have a height at least 1/40 of the total frame height. In order that a 35-mm slide be legible when projected in an average size room, the slide itself should be legible when held 10 inches (25 cm) in front of the eye.
    6. Make symbols no less than 1/3 the height of a capital letter. Break away any line that would otherwise pass through a character or symbol.
    7. Black lines on clear background or white lines on black background are more legible than colored lines. Use color only if required to distinguish different curves or elements.
    8. On each slide put a ‘‘thumb mark'' on the corner that is the upper right-hand corner when the slide is viewed inverted, so that on later projection the image is upright. Number the slides in order of presentation, on or beside the ‘thumb mark.'' 9. Video tapes must be in the standard VHS format. Videotapes not in the standard VHS format must be converted to this format by the individual presenter prior to the meeting.
    B. Presentation
    1. Organize your talk with introduction, body, and summary or conclusion. Include only facts or concepts that can be explained adequately in the allotted time. Rehearse talk so you can confidently deliver it in that time.
    2. Session Chairs have been instructed to adhere to the time schedule and to stop your presentation if you run over.
    3. An A/V preview room will be available for viewing computer presentations, transparencies or videotapes before your session starts.
    4. Arrive early enough so that you can meet the session chair, load your computer presentation on to the computer provided, check your slides in the projector, and familiarize yourself with the microphone, slide controls, laser pointer, and other equipment.
    5. Every time you display a slide the audience needs time to interpret it. Although you are familiar with the data, the audience may not be. Describe the abscissa, ordinate, units, and the legend for each curve. If the shape of a curve or some other feature is important, tell the audience what they should observe in order to grasp the point. They won't have time to figure it out for themselves.
    C. References
    1. Hubbard, H.H. ‘‘Guidelines for the planning and preparation of illustrated technical talks,'' J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 60, 995--998 (1976).
    2. Young, R.W. ‘‘On presenting a technical paper,'' J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 61, 1086--1087 (1977).

    46. SUGGESTIONS FOR EFFECTIVE POSTER PRESENTATIONS
    A board approximately 8 ft. wide x 4 ft. high will be provided for the display of each poster paper. Supplies will be available for attaching the poster material to the display boards. Each board will be marked with the board location number. Note that the board location number may not correspond with the abstract number. Authors should furnish, as part of their poster presentation, a sign giving the abstract number, paper title and author(s) name, in lettering approximately 1-1/2 inch high. Free-hand lettering with a felt pen is entirely adequate.

    A poster paper should be able to ‘‘stand alone,'' that is, be understandable even if the author is not present to explain, discuss, and answer questions. This is highly desirable because the author may not be present for the entire time the poster papers are on display, and when the author is engaged in discussion with one person, others may want to study the display without interrupting an ongoing dialogue. To meet the ‘‘stand alone'' criteria, it is suggested that authors consider the following elements for a poster. Each element can be arranged on one or more standard letter-size sheets. Where typing is needed, large font type is very effective. Careful hand lettering, at least 1/4 in. high, is also acceptable. Obviously, it may not be appropriate for any given paper to include all of the ‘‘elements'' listed below. These are merely suggestions:

    1. Objective, purpose, goal, etc.
    2. Background information. Prior work.
    3. Assumptions, etc.
    4. Experimental arrangements, block diagram, sketch, photos, parameters.
    5. Outline of the theoretical development.
    6. Data, graphs, tables, etc.

    Graphs and photographs should be a minimum of 8x10 inches. Figure captions are essential. Avoid glossy paper. Display objects, such as transducer elements or materials, demonstration tapes, etc., are excellent supplements to a poster. Since the poster paper is not archival, feel free to bring incompletely reduced data for discussion.

    47. GUIDELINES FOR USE OF COMPUTER PROJECTION IN MEETING PRESENTATIONS
    A PC computer with audio playback capability and projector will be provided in each meeting room on which all authors who plan to use computer projection should load their presentations. Authors should bring computer presentations on a CD or USB drive to load onto the provided computer and should arrive at the meeting rooms at least 30 minutes before the start of their sessions. Assistance in loading presentations onto the computers will be provided.

    Note that only PC format will be supported so authors using Macs must save their presentations for projection in PC format. Also, authors who plan to play audio during their presentations should insure that their sound files are also saved on the CD or USB drive.

    In NOISE-CON sessions, authors must use the computer that will be provided.

    Presenters in ASA-sponsored sessions also have the option to connect their own laptops to the computer projector as was done at past ASA meetings. The following guidelines should be observed by speakers presenting Power Point or equivalent presentations at meetings of the Acoustical Society of America who plan to use their own computers in their presentations.

    It is strongly recommended that overhead transparencies be brought to the session by speakers as backup.

    Introduction
    It is essential that each speaker connect his/her own laptop to the computer projection system in the A/V preview room prior to session start time to verify that the presentation will work properly. Technical assistance is available in the A/V preview room at the meeting, but not in session rooms. Presenters whose computers fail to project for any reason will not be granted extra time.

    Guidelines
    1. Set your computer's screen resolution to 600 by 800 pixels or to the resolution indicated by the AV technical support. If it looks OK, it will probably look OK to your audience during your presentation.
    2. Use all of the available screen area. If a page in portrait orientation is displayed in landscape orientation computer projection, the two sides of the projected image will be blank, effectively shrinking the text size. All documents/figures should be created in landscape orientation with very thin margins, thereby making maximum use of the (limited) resolution of the computer projector.
    3. No more than 2 graphs/plots/figures should be included on a single slide. Use large lettering for axis labels and bold fonts for the numbers. Remember that graphics can be animated or quickly toggled among several options: comparisons between figures may be made temporally rather than spatially.
    4. Avoid thin fonts, including fonts with thin elements (e.g., the horizontal bar of the "e" may be lost because it is less than one pixel wide at the low resolution of the computer projector, thereby registering as a "c"). If using a thin font, make it bold to widen the minimum line width. Avoid thin lines which may look fine when viewed on the high screen resolution setting but will fade or disappear when a low screen resolution is set.
    5. Contrasts must be enhanced in computer-projected documents for good visibility. Use dark backgrounds with lighter (contrasting) lettering, rather than white backgrounds with dark lettering. Avoid "busy" backgrounds, and keep text and figures simple and large.
    6. Avoid the use of red, especially on purple or green backgrounds. People with common color blindness will not see figures in red if they are backed by similar colors.
    7. Avoid large borders and logos of institutions as these leave a reduced area for actual data and graphs. If such borders or logos are necessary, place them at the bottom of the slide so that your technical data appears at the top of the projected image.
    8. Animations often run more slowly on laptops connected to computer video projectors than when not so connected. Test the effectiveness of your animations before your assigned presentation time on a similar projection system (e.g., in the A/V preview room). Avoid real-time calculations in favor of pre-calculation and saving of images.
    9. If you will use your own laptop instead of the computer provided, a video switcher will be available. During the question and answer period of the previous speaker, connect your laptop to the video switcher. It is good protocol to initiate your slide show (e.g., run PowerPoint) immediately once connected, so the audience doesn't have to wait. When it is your turn to present, the session chair will press the button on the switcher corresponding to the appropriate number of the input to which you connected (indicated on the cord you plugged into your computer). If there are any problems, the session chair will endeavor to assist you, but it is your responsibility to ensure that the technical details have been worked out ahead of time.
    10. During the presentation have your laptop running with main power instead of using battery power to insure that the laptop is running at full CPU speed. This will also guarantee that your laptop does not run out of power during your presentation.

    Specific Hardware Configurations
    Macintosh
    Older Macs require a special adapter to connect the video output port to the standard 15-pin male DIN connector. Make sure you have one with you.

    1. Hook everything up before powering anything on. (Connect the computer to the RGB input on the projector).
    2. Turn the projector on and boot up the Macintosh. If this doesn't work immediately, you should make sure that your monitor resolution is set to 1024x768 for an XGA projector or at least 640x480 for an older VGA projector. (800x600 will most always work.). You should also make sure that your monitor controls are set to mirroring.
    If it's an older powerbook, it may not have video mirroring, but something called "simulscan," which is essentially the same. Depending upon the vintage of your Mac, you may have to reboot once it is connected to the computer projector or switcher. Hint: you can reboot while connected to the computer projector in the A/V preview room in advance of your presentation, then put your computer to sleep. Macs thus booted will retain the memory of this connection when awakened from sleep. Alternatively, you can reboot while connected to the video switcher during the previous speaker's presentation, but it is safer to queue this up in advance of the session. Depending upon the vintage of your system software, you may find that the default video mode is a side-by-side configuration of monitor windows (the test for this will be that you see no menus or cursor on your desktop; the cursor will slide from the projected image onto your laptop's screen as it is moved). Go to Control Panels, Monitors, configuration, and drag the larger window onto the smaller one. This produces a mirror-image of the projected image on your laptop's screen.
    Also depending upon your system software, either the Control Panels will automatically detect the video projector's resolution and frame rate, or you will have to set it manually. If it is not set at a commensurable resolution, the projector may not show an image. Experiment ahead of time with resolution and color depth settings in the A/V preview room (please don't waste valuable time fiddling with your Control Panel settings during your allotted session time).

    PC
    Make sure your computer has the standard female 15-pin DE-15 video output connector. Some computers require an adaptor. Once your computer is physically connected, you will need to toggle the video display on. Most PCs use either ALT-F5 or F6, as indicated by a little video monitor icon on the appropriate key. Some systems require more elaborate keystroke combinations to activate this feature. Verify your laptop's compatibility with the projector in the AV preview room. Likewise, you may have to set your laptop's resolution and color depth via the monitor's Control Panel to match that of the projector, which settings you should verify prior to your session.

    Linux
    Most Linux laptops have a function key marked CRT/LCD or two symbols representing computer versus projector. Often that key toggles on and off the VGA output of the computer, but in some cases, doing so will cause the computer to crash. One fix for this is to boot up the BIOS and look for a field marked CRT/LCD (or similar). This field can be set to "Both," in which case the signal to the laptop is always presented to the VGA output jack on the back of the computer. Once connected to a computer projector, the signal will appear automatically, without toggling the function key. Once you get it working, don't touch it and it should continue to work, even after reboot.

    48. DATES OF FUTURE ASA MEETINGS
    For further information on any ASA meeting, or to obtain instructions for the preparation and submission of meeting abstracts, contact the Acoustical Society of America, Suite 1NO1, 2 Huntington Quadrangle, Melville, NY 11747-4502; Telephone: 516-576-2360; Fax: 516-576-2377; E-mail: asa@aip.org

    5–9 June 2006 - Providence, Rhode Island (Deadline for receipt of abstracts: 24 January 2006)
    28 November -2 December 2006, Honolulu, Hawaii (Deadline for receipt of abstracts: 30 June 2006)
    4–8 June 2007, Salt Lake City, Utah
    27 November-1 December 2007, New Orleans, Louisiana