ACOUSTICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA

150TH MEETING
HELD JOINTLY WITH NOISE-CON 2005

ANNOUNCEMENT AND CALL FOR PAPERS

17--21 October 2005
Minneapolis, Minnesota

The 150th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America will be held Monday through Friday, 17–21 October 2005 at the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. NOISE-CON 2005 will be held in conjunction with the meeting, Monday through Wednesday, 17-19 October 2005. A block of rooms has been reserved at the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel.

Information about the meeting also appears on the ASA Home Page at asa.aip.org.

THE DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF ABSTRACTS IS MONDAY, 6 JUNE 2005. THIS DEADLINE WILL BE STRICTLY ENFORCED. LATE ABSTRACTS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Authors have the option to submit their abstracts via the World Wide Web, electronic template or postal mail.

Authors submitting papers for NOISE-CON sessions please note: There are special procedures and earlier abstract submission deadlines. Please see www.noisecon2005.org for further details.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

TECHNICAL PROGRAM AND SPECIAL SESSIONS

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

Contributed papers are welcome in all branches of acoustics. The technical program will consist of lecture and poster sessions. Technical sessions will be scheduled Monday through Friday, 17-21 October for the ASA meeting and Monday through Wednesday, 17-19 October for NOISE-CON 2005.

Every effort will be made to schedule contributed papers in accordance with author and Technical Committee preferences. However, authors should be prepared to accept assignment to poster sessions. Assignments will take into account: a) author preference, b) program balance, and c) Technical Committee instructions. Papers will be rejected if they do not comply with the instructions.

The special sessions described below will be organized by the ASA Technical Committees and the Institute of Noise Control Engineering (INCE). Authors of invited papers must indicate on their abstracts the title of the special session in which they have been invited to participate. Authors of contributed papers have the option to request placement of their abstracts in these sessions. If no special session placement is requested, papers will be scheduled in sessions with papers of similar technical content.

SPECIAL SESSIONS AND DESCRIPTIVE SENTENCES

ACOUSTICAL OCEANOGRAPHY (AO)

Ocean ecosystem measurement
(Joint with Animal Bioacoustics)
Use of acoustics to determine the abundance distribution and behavior of marine organisms in relation to their environment

Inversion using ambient noise sources
Inversion techniques for estimation of ocean environments using natural and man-made noise as sound sources

ANIMAL BIOACOUSTICS (AB)

Cognition in the acoustic behavior of animals
(Joint with Psychological and Physiological Acoustics)
Research on cognitive processes involved in the acoustic behavior of a variety of animals, including dolphins, bats, birds, primates and others

Frequency weighting for animal species
(Joint with Psychological and Physiological Acoustics and ASA Committee on Standards)
Development of frequency weighting functions for animals

Temporal patterns of sounds by marine mammals
Analysis of the patterns of sound usage in wild and captive pinnipeds and cetaceans

ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS (AA)

Comparison of U.S. and international standards in architectural acoustics
(Joint with ASA Committee on Standards)
Some standards in common use among architectural acousticians in the U.S. are very similar to those commonly used in the U.K., Germany, Japan, etc., and others are very different. Will explore differences and highlight pros and cons

Indoor noise criteria
(Joint with NOISE-CON and Noise)
Investigations into occupant perception of indoor noise, including productivity effects and relationships to indoor noise criteria systems

ISO 3382 and electroacoustics measurement workshop
(Joint with Engineering Acoustics)
Theory and practice of advanced acoustic measurements. Will include discussion of signal acquisition, analysis array test stimulus optimization

Plumbing noise
(Joint with Noise and NOISE-CON)
Experiences regarding plumbing noise, preventive measures/ corrective actions in relation to occupant expectations and response

Reflections on reflections
State of the art methods for altering reflections using absorbers, diffusers and room geometry, and also how to measure, predict and evaluate the effects of these reflections in real and virtual environments

Speech privacy in buildings
Understandings of effects and techniques of speech privacy in public and performance spaces

Special session in honor of Cyril Harris
(Joint with NOISE-CON and Noise)
Presentations honoring Cyril Harris's contributions

Safety of acoustical products
(Joint with Noise and NOISE-CON)
presenting the various hazards (fire, toxic fumes, etc.) of acoustical products commonly in use

BIOMEDICAL ULTRASOUND/BIORESPONSE TO VIBRATION (BB)

Acoustic radiation force methods for medical imaging and tissue evaluation
(Joint with Physical Acoustics)
Radiation force is used to induce motion in tissue and the response may be measured by a variety of methods including MRI, acoustic emission and Doppler ultrasound

Medical applications of time reversal acoustics
(Joint with Physical Acoustics and Signal Processing in Acoustics)
Use of acoustic time reversal for imaging and therapy in the body

Topical meeting on imaging and control of HIFU-induced lesions
Methods for detecting lesions created in tissue by focused ultrasound therapy. A one-day colloquium and discussion on the topic "Imaging and Control HIFU-Induced Lesions" will be held. Subtopics will focus on the following areas: Real-time Monitoring (MRI and Ultrasound), Quantitative Imaging for Damage Assessment, Noninvasive Temperature Monitoring and Control, and Contrast-assisted Imaging and Lesion Formation. Each subtopic session will consist of invited and contributed papers and be followed by a panel discussion.

EDUCATION IN ACOUSTICS (ED)

Acoustics demonstrations
A series of acoustics demonstrations

Hands-on workshop for high school students
Hands-on experiments including measurements

"Take 5's" - Sharing ideas for teaching acoustics
Bring short presentations and demonstrations (no abstracts required)

ENGINEERING ACOUSTICS (EA)

An ANSI standard for measuring in-situ directivity of hearing aids in 3-dimensions
(Joint with ASA Committee on Standards)
A review of technical aspects and results using ANSI standard S3.35 revised in 2005 to include directivity index (DI) calculations from manikin directional responses that are produced by sound sources at several azimuths and elevations

MUSICAL ACOUSTICS (MU)

Acoustics of choir singing
(Joint with Architectural Acoustics)
Acoustics of voices in choral ensemble singing and architectural considerations involved in the design of performance spaces

Music information retrieval
(Joint with Signal Processing in Acoustics)
Automatic retrieval or classification of music information such as melodic content, key, tempo, instrumentation and musical genre

Nonlinear vibrations of strings
Topics can include theory, simulations and measurements

Patents in musical acoustics
Papers related to patented devices and instruments

NOISE (NS)

Advances in noise, vibration and harshness in automotive design
(Joint with NOISE-CON, Structural Acoustics and Vibration and Physical Acoustics)
How NVH problems in vehicle design are being treated analytically and experimentally

Current status of noise policy
(Joint with NOISE-CON)
The current status of noise policy and the potential for advancements are discussed

Hospital interior noise control
(Joint with NOISE-CON, Engineering Acoustics and Architectural Acoustics)
Architectural guidelines and materials suitable for noise reduction in hospitals

Laser Doppler vibrometry measurements in underwater and radiation problems
(Joint with NOISE-CON, Structural Acoustics and Vibration and Physical Acoustics)
Will focus on laser Doppler vibrometer measurements of underwater structures and methods of determining radiation from measured velocity response

Special session in honor of William W. Lang
(Joint with NOISE-CON and ASA Committee on Standards)
Presentations on aspects of Bill Lang's life

Specifying uncertainties in acoustic measurements
(Joint with NOISE-CON and ASA Committee on Standards)
Will examine variabilities and motivate understanding error propagation in acoustic measurements

Workshop on methods for community noise and annoyance evaluation II
(Joint with NOISE-CON)
Applied measurements, qualitative and quantitative methods; synergetic noise

NOISE-CON 2005

Product noise and vibration control - Case studies
(Joint with Noise)
Case studies from practicing engineers working on noise and vibration control problems. Expected to span two to three session times

Measurement of information technology product noise emissions
(Joint with Noise)
Measurement techniques and metrics for quantification of noise from information technology equipment

Measurement of product noise emissions
(Joint with Noise)
Measurement techniques and metrics for quantification of noise from consumer products

Array methods for noise source visualization
(Joint with Noise and Signal Processing in Acoustics)
Nearfield acoustic holography, acoustic intensity methods and beam-forming are examples of sound field visualization methods. This session will focus on these and other methods to produce visualizations of sound fields with stationary and/or moving sources

Forensic acoustics (Joint with Noise and Engineering Acoustics)
Many noise control engineers are asked to be expert witnesses in cases. This session is focused on examples of acoustical and noise control engineers' involvement in forensics

Products for noise control
(Joint with Noise)
Session is focused on materials for industrial and architectural noise control. Case histories involving noise control products will be presented

Energy methods in transportation noise
(Joint with Noise)
Will include case studies on the application of energy methods in transportation applications such as aircraft, automobiles, trucks and spacecraft. Session may also include presentations on new and modifications to existing energy methods

Numerical methods in acoustics
(Joint with Noise)
Focused on developments and applications of numerical modeling techniques for noise and vibration

Active noise control: Centralized versus decentralized control
(Joint with Noise and Engineering Acoustics)
Focused on types of control strategies in active noise control systems

Applications of active noise control
(Joint with Noise and Engineering Acoustics)
Focused on case histories and potential applications of active noise control

From noise control to product design
(Joint with Noise)
Acoustic and non-acoustic constraints and product functionality have to be factored into product design. Product sound can enhance functionality by providing feedback to the user of the machine. This session is focused on how understanding of noise control strategies, sound perception and the desired functionality of the machine can be factored into product design

Sound quality and soundscapes
(Joint with Noise and Psychological and Physiological Acoustics)
Depending on the tasks being performed within an interior space (office, factory, home, car, spacestation, etc.) what constitutes an ideal acoustic environment may differ. Objectives for noise control must be set so that the results enhance the overall soundscape. In this session, the relationship between the sound quality of individual sound sources and the quality of the overall acoustic environment will be explored

Environmental sound quality
(Joint with Noise)
Much of noise in outdoor spaces is quantified by using metrics that are functions of A-weighted sound pressure level. Level, while important, is not the only sound attribute that impacts the quality of the outdoor acoustic environment. Presentations will be focused on measurement, quantification and enhancement of environmental sound quality

Methods for predicting and assessing community responses to noise
(Joint with Noise)
Session is focused on tools to assess community response to existing noise sources and to predict community response changes in local infrastructure that will impact the acoustic landscape

Case studies: The environmental impact analysis process (EIAP)
(Joint with Noise)
Will examine the success of environmental impact analysis process by studying its use in a variety of situations

Power plant noise: Technology that limits power plant noise control
(Joint with Noise)
Will examine how limitations in technology restrict control of power plant noise, with the aim of defining a systematic strategy for technology development to address power plant noise and reduce its impact on the environment

State and local noise policies and noise ordinances
(Joint with Noise)
The session will be focused on local and state, rather than federal policies

Public policy workshop
(Joint with Noise)
The aim of this workshop is to formulate a national noise policy

Role of vibrations and rattle in annoyance
(Joint with Noise and Psychological and Physiological Acoustics)
Rattle and vibration coupled with sound and knowledge of the source impact people's evaluation of the sound. This session is focused on research studies on multi-modal (noise and vibration) responses and research on community response to sounds that are accompanied by vibration and rattle

Rail noise and vibration issues
(Joint with Noise)
Focused on modeling sources, propagation and the impact in communities of rail transportation noise and vibration

Mitigating the effects of construction noise
(Joint with Noise)
Strategies to mitigate the effect of construction noise will be presented, including scheduling, barriers and other noise control methods and community engagement

Noise intrusion in the natural landscape
(Joint with Noise)
Quiet sounds that are perceived as "not belonging" to a particular environment often cause people to complain. Similarly, loud sounds that are perceived as being part of the natural landscape are accepted. Clearly the level-based metrics currently in use for environmental noise are not appropriate in these situations. This session focuses on issues related to these intrusive sounds

Noticeability of noise: Time structure
(Joint with Noise and Signal Processing in Acoustics)
Sounds like speech or music attract attention, perhaps because of the information contained within, or perhaps it is because it is difficult to "tune-out" sounds where the level is continuously changing. In this session, the characteristics of the temporal structure of sounds and how that impacts noticeability will be examined

Transportation noise criteria
(Joint with Noise)
Noise criteria are used to help engineers set objectives in noise control. However, the question still remains, was the noise control successful? Did meeting the criteria actually result in an improvement in the quality of the acoustic environment? This session will be a series of case studies where the success of meeting noise criteria will be examined

Issues in aircraft noise analysis
(Joint with Noise)
This session will focus on shortcoming of currently used techniques and proposals for alternative methods to analyze noise due to aircraft

Progress in aircraft noise research
(Joint with Noise)
This is a series of presentations focused around the activities in the FAA/NASA Center for Excellence for Noise and Emissions Mittigation. Results of recent airport noise measurements, a study on noise impact of aircraft landing maneuvering strategies, land usage and airport encroachment research as well as proposed studies on supersonic aircraft noise will be presented

Aircraft source noise research
(Joint with Noise)
An overview of current understanding of jet noise will start this session which will also include, for example, noise analysis for engine noise cycle design, sound source reduction and absorption strategies, as well as measurement techniques to help understand jet noise characteristics and to validate jet engine noise reduction strategies

Advances in military jet noise modeling
(Joint with Noise and Physical Acoustics)
Focused on military jet noise modeling including supersonic aircraft

Tire/pavement noise and quiet pavement applications
(Joint with Noise)
Case histories of quiet pavement projects will be presented along with papers on modeling and research of tire/pavement sound and vibration generation and propagation

Vehicle noise measurement
(Joint with Noise)
Session will be focused on techniques to measure interior and exterior vehicular noise. May also include papers on the relationship between the sound analysis results and the perception of vehicle quality, and on the verification of noise-control treatments.

Classroom acoustics
(Joint with Noise, Architectural Acoustics and ASA Committee on Standards)
Session is focused on noise-control and architectural design strategies to meet standards on classroom acoustics. Session will include case histories, success stories and challenges that remain

Innovative solutions to architectural design and to meeting LEED and HIPAA requirements
(Joint with Architectural Acoustics and Noise)
Energy, environmental and privacy concerns affect the architectural and acoustic designs of buildings and public spaces. These also impact noise control strategies for existing buildings. While often viewed as a problem, these challenges can sometimes lead to innovation solutions that are improvements on solutions arrived at without these constraints

PHYSICAL ACOUSTICS (PA)

Thermoacoustics: What we are doing, and why our customers want it (Joint with Engineering Acoustics)
Physics and applications of thermoacoustics

SIGNAL PROCESSING IN ACOUSTICS (SP)

Biomedical acoustic signal processing
(Joint with Biomedical Ultrasound/Bioresponse to Vibration)
Will discuss various signal processing and imaging techniques employed in biomedical acoustic imaging, diagnostics and therapies

Non-blind and blind deconvolution in acoustics
(Joint with Underwater Acoustics, Animal Bioacoustics, Noise, Acoustical Oceanography and Engineering Acoustics)
The use of deconvolution to find the input or the impulse response in an experiment when one of the two is known or when neither one is known

SPEECH COMMUNICATION (SC)

Phonetic linguistics: Honoring the contributions of Peter Ladefoged
In honor or Peter Ladefoged's 80th birthday and his 50 years of research in linguistic phonetic aspects of speech communication

STRUCTURAL ACOUSTICS AND VIBRATION (SA)

Experimental modal analysis
(Joint with Signal Processing in Acoustics)
Experimental methods for determining resonant frequencies and mode shapes in structures

Vibration in transit systems
(Joint with Noise and NOISE-CON)
Generation of and propagation of vibration in transit systems

UNDERWATER ACOUSTICS (UW)

Head waves and interface waves
(Joint with Acoustical Oceanography)
Propagation of head (lateral) waves, interface waves and other wave phenomena near cut-off and their potential for geoacoustic inversion

Sonar performance and signal processing in uncertain environments
(Joint with Signal Processing in Acoustics and Engineering Acoustics)
Explores and quantifies environmental uncertainty and potentials for robust processing

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OTHER TECHNICAL EVENTS

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE

The technical Committee on Architectural Acoustics will sponsor a distinguished lecture presented by Manfred R. Schroeder titled "How I stumbled onto number theory when in need of more sound diffusion."

NOISE-CON 2005 PLENARY TALKS

Carl Burleson of the Federal Aviation Administration will present a plenary talk on Monday morning, 17 October, titled "Perspectives on noise in the menu of environmental issues, and the role of technical solutions relative to policy approaches."

Paul Donavan of Illingworth-Rodkin will present a plenary talk on Tuesday morning, 18 October, titled "Tire and pavement noise and the potential impact of quiet pavement technology."

James West of The Johns Hopkins University will present a plenary talk on Wednesday morning, 19 October, titled "Hospital noise, its role in patient well-being and the challenges for noise control engineers."

POWER PLANT NOISE SEMINAR

A seminar on Power Plant Noise will be given by Frank Brittain on Sunday, 16 October 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. The seminar will review the basics of noise control for combustion turbine power plants–both simple and combined cycle. The major noise sources will be identified, and proven controls will be discussed. A brief description of how power plants and their equipment work will also be included. This seminar is intended for noise control engineers who have either very limited experience with power plants, or are involved with supplying equipment for power plants.

For registration details contact the INCE business office:
ibo@inceusa.org

For more information on the seminar content contact: Frank Brittain, fnbritta@bechtel.com

TECHNICAL TOURS

A tour of the Aero Systems Engineering (ASE) Fluidyne lab is planned for Monday, October 17. A bus will pick up participants in the morning at approximately 9:00 a.m. and return in time for the afternoon sessions. A box lunch will be provided during the bus ride back. There will be approximately 45 available spots on the bus, and there will be a $5 charge to cover the box lunch (Aero Systems Engineering is subsidizing the lunch and transportation). For more information about ASE, visit
www.aerosysengr.com.

ASA/INCE members are also invited to a rehearsal of the famed Minnesota Orchestra (Osmo Vanska, conductor) on Tuesday afternoon, 18 October. After the rehearsal we will be treated to a guided tour of Orchestra Hall with Cyril Harris as our tour guide. The Minnesota Orchestra is across the street from the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel

Register for the tours by using the registration form or online at http://asa.aip.org

ONLINE MEETING PAPERS

The ASA has replaced its traditional at-meeting "Paper Copying Service" with an online site which can be found at
scitation.aip.org/asameetingpapers/. Authors of papers to be presented at meetings will be able to post their full papers or presentation materials for others who are interested in obtaining detailed information about meeting presentations. The online site will be open for author submissions in September. Submission procedures and password information will be mailed to authors with the acceptance notices.

Those interested in obtaining copies of submitted papers for this meeting and the immediate past meeting may access the service at anytime. No password is needed.

EXPOSITION

The meeting will be highlighted by a large exposition, jointly sponsored by the ASA and INCE. It will feature 40 displays with instruments, materials, and services for the acoustical and vibration community. The expo which be conveniently located near the registration area and meeting rooms will open at the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel with a reception on Monday evening, 17 October, and will close Wednesday at noon. Morning and afternoon refreshments, will be available in the exposition area.

The exposition will include computer-based instrumentation, sound level meters, sound intensity systems, signal processing systems, devices for noise control, sound prediction software, acoustical materials, passive and active noise control systems and other exhibits on vibrations and acoustics. For further information, please contact Richard J. Peppin, Exposition Manager, Institute of Noise Control Engineering c/o Scantek, Inc., 7060 Oakland Mills Road, #L, Columbia, MD 21046, (T) 410-290-7726, (F) 410-290-9167, peppinr@scantekinc.com.

WORKSHOP FOR ASA JOURNAL AUTHORS AND READERS

The American Institute of Physics (AIP) will hold a two-hour workshop to describe electronic services provided for ASA journal authors and readers. This will include information on Peer Xpress for The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America (JASA) and Applied Research Letters Online (ARLO), multimedia, Scitation searching and other electronic services.

MEETING PROGRAM

An advance meeting program summary will be published in the August issue of JASA and a complete meeting program will be mailed as Part 2 of the September issue. Abstracts will be available on the
ASA Home Page in September.

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ABSTRACT SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

ABSTRACT PREPARATION

An abstract of not more than 200 words is required for each paper, whether invited or contributed. ABSTRACTS LONGER THAN 200 WORDS WILL BE EDITED OR TRUNCATED. Authors have the option to submit abstracts via the World Wide Web, by electronic template or by postal mail. Abstracts must be prepared in accordance with the instructions given for the submission method selected.

NOISE-CON 2005 ABSTRACT PREPARATION

If you are planning to write a paper to appear in the NOISE-CON 2005 proceedings, please follow the NOISE-CON 2005 submission instructions which can be found on www.noisecon2005.org. Deadlines for abstracts of papers that will appear in the NOISE-CON 2005 proceedings are different than ASA abstract deadlines; this is meant to facilitate timely paper preparation. Please see the section on Noise-Con 2005 below for further details.

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Authors should use only one method of abstract submission, i.e., via the web, by electronic template or by postal mail. Electronic template abstracts should be submitted to the e-mail address given in the on-line template (Section 1). For abstracts submitted by postal mail, send one original paper-copy abstract to the Technical Program Chair:

Neal F. Viemeister
c/o Elaine Moran
Acoustical Society of America
Suite 1NO1
2 Huntington Quadrangle
Melville, NY 11747-4502, USA
Tel: 516-576-2360

ALL ABSTRACTS MUST BE RECEIVED BY MONDAY, 6 JUNE 2005. This deadline will be strictly enforced. Abstracts submitted after 6 June 2005 will not be accepted. Authors should allow at least 5 days for delivery of paper-copy abstracts by U.S. or Canadian mail, 2 days for express mail, and 10 days for international air mail. FACSIMILE TRANSMITTED ABSTRACTS OR ABSTRACTS SENT BY REGULAR E-MAIL WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Contributors submitting electronic abstracts will automatically receive acknowledgment that their abstracts have been received. Contributors submitting abstracts by postal mail who desire notification of receipt of their abstracts should include self-addressed postcards. Acceptance notices will be mailed to authors in August.

Authors submitting papers for NOISE-CON sessions please note: There are special procedures and earlier abstract submission deadlines. Please see the Noise-Con 2005 section below for further details.

ABSTRACT LIMITATIONS

ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF RECEIPT OF ABSTRACTS SUBMITTED ELECTRONICALLY OR ON THE WORLD WIDE WEB

Authors submitting abstracts by electronic template will receive automatic notification of receipt of their submissions. If the submission is incorrect, it will be rejected by the computer program and an error message will be returned to the author. Upon receipt of such message, the submission must be corrected and sent again.

For abstracts submitted on the World Wide Web, a resubmission number and PIN will be issued for each submitted abstract which constitutes acknowledgment that the abstract has been received by the Society.

If you do not receive acknowledgment as described above, your abstract has not been received by the Society. Please contact ASA [516-576-2360; asa@aip.org] immediately if you have submitted an abstract and do not receive an immediate acknowledgment of receipt or an error message.

AUDIO-VISUAL AND SPECIAL EQUIPMENT

AUDIO-VISUAL EQUIPMENT

PC computers with audio playback capability and projectors, overhead transparency projectors and laser pointers will be provided in all sessions. All other equipment is considered to be special equipment. Refer to the "Special Equipment" section below for additional information. Note that Mac computers will not be provided.

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT AND COMPUTER EQUIPMENT

Any equipment other than PC computers with audio playback capability and projectors, overhead transparency projectors and laser pointers is "special equipment," and must be separately requested at the bottom of the abstract. Requests for special equipment (i.e., 35 mm slide projectors, VCR's and monitors, dual slide and/or overhead projectors, audiotape playback equipment, CD players or high fidelity audio systems) must be specified on the abstract. Provision of unusual special equipment will depend upon availability and cost.

Please be specific about your audio needs, including number of channels and preferred loudspeaker arrangement.

POSTER SESSION BOARDS

Poster boards and fastening materials will be provided.

PROJECTION GUIDELINES FOR AUTHORS

A PC computer with audio playback capability and projector will be provided in each meeting room on which all authors who plan to use computer projection will load their presentations. Authors should bring computer presentations on a CD or USB drive to load onto the provided computer and should arrive at the meeting rooms at least 30 minutes before the start of their sessions. Authors also have the option to connect their own laptops to the computer projector as was done at past ASA meetings. Assistance in loading presentations onto the computers will be provided.

Authors are encouraged to bring copies of their presentation materials on overhead transparencies as a backup.

Note that only PC format will be supported so authors using Macs must save their presentations for projection in PC format. Also, authors who plan to play audio during their presentations should insure that their sound files are also saved on the CD or USB drive.

Authors using 35 mm slides should note that they must bring a preloaded carousel to the session. Schedule restrictions will not allow time to load carousels during a session. To ensure that projected material is legible in the rear of a meeting room, lettering should be at least 1/40 the overall height of the projected material, e.g., at least 0.2 inches high on an 8 x 9-inch transparency. Guidelines for use of computer projection will be supplied with acceptance letters.

COMPUTER PROJECTION INFORMATION FOR NOISE-CON 2005 SESSIONS

For those with PowerPoint presentations, we will supply a laptop computer and projector. To make sure that your presentation is ready to go for your talk, INCE/USA asks that you arrive about 30 minutes before the session starts so that your presentation can be loaded into "the" computer. Bring your presentation on a CD or a USB drive. There will be someone there to help. Overhead projectors will also be provided. We have done everything we can to prevent computer problems, but please bring backup transparencies anyway.

AUDIO/VISUAL PREVIEW ROOM

Transparency presentations, computer presentations and other audio/visual materials can be reviewed by authors in the audio/visual preview room at the meeting.

ASA BEST PAPER AWARDS FOR STUDENTS AND YOUNG PRESENTERS

Several of the ASA Technical Committees offer Best Paper Awards to students and young presenters who present papers at Society meetings. If you want your paper to be considered for an award, you must indicate this when you submit your abstract. Follow the instructions for the appropriate technical area that appear below.

BEST STUDENT PAPER AWARDS

COMMITTEES OFFERING THESE AWARDS:
Acoustical Oceanography, Animal Bioacoustics, Architectural Acoustics, Biomedical Ultrasound/Bioresponse to Vibration (Spring meetings only), Engineering Acoustics, Musical Acoustics, Speech Communication, Structural Acoustics and Vibration, and Underwater Acoustics

AWARD AMOUNTS:
For each of the Technical Committees granting awards, up to two awards will be presented to students presenting papers in sessions organized by the specific Technical Committee: $300 for first prize and $200 for second prize.

QUALIFICATIONS:
To qualify for each of these awards, an author must:

---be enrolled as a student at least half-time (graduates are eligible if the work being presented was performed as a student within one year of the meeting). Note that you do not need to be a member of the ASA to qualify.
--- be listed as the first author on the submitted abstract
---present the paper at the meeting
---submit a copy of the presentation materials or a written text to the paper copy center, unless the paper is presented in a poster session (except for entries in Animal Bioacoustics, Speech Communication or Underwater Acoustics)

SELECTION:
The award winners will be selected by a subcommittee of each of the Technical Committees granting awards, based upon the quality of both the content of the paper and its presentation. The awards will be announced either at the meeting of the Technical Committee or after the close of the meeting.

APPLICATION:
All those who wish to participate in the competition for these awards must indicate their intention by putting the following statement at the bottom of the abstract submitted for the meeting:

For (name of appropriate Technical Committee) Best Student Paper Award

BEST "OUTSTANDING PAPER BY A YOUNG PRESENTER" AWARDS

Note that you need not be a student to qualify for these two awards.

COMMITTEES OFFERING THESE AWARDS:
Noise and Signal Processing in Acoustics

AWARD AMOUNTS:
Noise - Up to three awards of up to $250 each will be given for outstanding papers presented in sessions organized by the Technical Committee on Noise.

Signal Processing - One award of $500 each will be given for outstanding paper presented in a session organized by the Technical Committee on Signal Processing in Acoustics.

QUALIFICATIONS:
To qualify for an award, the paper author must:

---be under 30 years of age as of 1 January 2004
---be listed as the first author of the paper and actually present the paper

SELECTION:
Selection of the award winners will be based on the quality of the presented paper, comprising both the content and its delivery. The award winners will be chosen by a subcommittee of the Technical Committee and will be announced after the close of the meeting.

APPLICATION:
The Award Subcommittees would like to consider papers by all authors who meet the eligibility criteria. Neither membership in the Acoustical Society, nor previous experience in the ASA, is required. Because the committees have no other way to identify eligible authors, however, it is essential that eligible authors identify themselves by placing the following statement at the bottom of the abstract submitted for the meeting:

Submitted For (name of appropriate Technical Committee) Young Presenter Award

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NOISE-CON 2005

The 21st annual conference of the Institute of Noise Control Engineering, NOISE-CON 2005, will run concurrently with the 150th Meeting of the Acoustical Society on Monday through Wednesday (17-19th October, 2005), culminating with the Closing Ceremony which will take place with the ASA Awards Ceremony on Wednesday afternoon (19th October, 2005). It is our plan that all of the Noise and some of the Architectural Acoustics Technical Sessions will be part of the joint ASA - NOISE-CON conference, thus forming an exciting and coherent program of noise control related sessions, which reflects the overlap in membership interests between the two organizations, and the spirit of co-operation that led to the decision to have this joint meeting. Note, there will be one registration fee for both conferences, so NOISE-CON 2005 participants are encouraged to take the opportunity to learn about some of the work being done in other areas of acoustics, not usually part of regular NOISE-CON technical programs, by attending the sessions taking place on Thursday and Friday.

All presentations in NOISE-CON 2005, including those in sessions jointly organized with the ASA Technical Committees, will be accompanied by a 4 to 8 page paper that will be published by the Institute of Noise Control Engineering (INCE) in the NOISE-CON 2005 Proceedings. ORGANIZERS of JOINT ASA/INCE SPECIAL SESSIONS should stress to session contributors the need to write papers for the NOISE-CON 2005 Proceedings

Special Sessions that will be part of the NOISE-CON 2005 program are being organized by INCE and also jointly by INCE and the ASA Noise, Architectural Acoustics, Engineering Acoustics, Physical Acoustics, Psychological and Physiological Acoustics, Signal Processing in Acoustics and Structural Acoustics Technical Committees. The INCE organized Special Sessions are listed below and also in the complete special sessions list on pages 2 to 6. Technical papers in ALL areas of noise control engineering are welcome, so your paper need not be part of one the special sessions. However, if there is synergy with particular special sessions, suggest that it be part of a particular session when you submit your abstract.

center>INCE ORGANIZED NOISE-CON 2005 SPECIAL SESSIONS

See the section on
special sessions for one-sentence descriptions.

For information about session organizers please visit
http://noisecon2005.org and click on special sessions.

Product noise and vibration control - Case studies
Measurement of information technology product noise emissions
Measurement of product noise emissions
Array methods for noise source visualization
Forensic acoustics
Products for noise control
Energy methods in transportation noise
Numerical methods in acoustics
Active noise control: Centralized versus decentralized control
Applications of active noise control
From noise control to product design
Sound quality and soundscapes
Environmental sound quality
Methods for predicting and assessing community responses to noise
Case studies: The environmental impact analysis process (EIAP)
Power plant noise: Technology that limits power plant noise control
State and local noise policies and noise ordinances
Public policy workshop
Role of vibrations and rattle in annoyance
Rail noise and vibration issues
Mitigating the effects of construction noise
Noise intrusion in the natural landscape
Noticeability of noise: Time structure
Transportation noise criteria
Issues in aircraft noise analysis
Progress in aircraft noise research
Aircraft source noise research
Advances in military jet noise modeling
Tire/pavement noise and quiet pavement applications
Vehicle noise measurement
Classroom acoustics
Innovative solutions to architectural design and to meeting LEED and HIPAA requirements

ASA ORGANIZED SPECIAL SESSIONS CO-SPONSORED BY NOISE-CON 2005

Indoor noise criteria
Plumbing noise
Special session in honor of Cyril Harris
Safety of acoustical products
Laser Doppler vibrometry measurements in underwater and radiation problems
Advances in noise, vibration and harshness in automotive design
Current status of noise policy
Hospital interior noise control
Special session in honor of William W. Lang
Specifying uncertainties in acoustic measurements
Workshop on methods for community noise and annoyance evaluation II
Vibration in transit systems

To facilitate NOISE-CON and ASA Technical Program organization, NOISE-CON 2005 ABSTRACT AND PAPER DEADLINES will be as follows:

NOISE-CON 2005 Abstract Deadline: May 1st, 2005, submission instructions are at . INCE personnel will upload these abstracts to the ASA database. Contributors do NOT need to send abstracts to both INCE and ASA, only one Abstract submission is required.

ASA Abstract Deadline: June 6th, 2005. Anyone who submits ASA Noise and Architectural Acoustics abstracts of relevance to noise control, but have not submitted an abstract first to Noise-Con 2005, will be encouraged to write a 4 to 6 page paper to appear in the Noise-Con 2005 proceedings, so that they are able to present in the joint ASA-INCE sessions.

NOISE-CON 2005 Paper Deadline Date: June 17th, 2005, submission information at . Format instructions for NOISE-CON 2005 papers will be given on this INCE-USA web site.

Daniel J. Kato of Cummins Power Generation is the NOISE-CON 2005 General Chair, with Robert J Bernhard of Purdue University as the Conference Co-chair. Patricia Davies and Stuart Bolton both of Purdue University are the technical program chairs. All NOISE-CON 2005 information including abstract and paper submission instructions will be handled through the Institute of Noise Control Engineering (INCE) web site www.noisecon2005.org.

A major technical exposition will be held at this joint NOISE-CON 2005 conference and 150th Meeting of the ASA. The exhibits will include computer-based instrumentation, multi-channel analyzers, sound quality systems, software for noise and vibration control analyses, acoustical materials, passive noise control devices, active control systems, and other products. Details regarding the exposition can be obtained from Richard J. Peppin of Scantek. Inc. who is the exposition manager or visit, www.noisecon2005.org.

CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

The Proceedings of NOISE-CON 2005 will be published on a CD-ROM, and will be available at the conference. The CD-ROM will contain additional NOISE-CON proceedings for the years 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2003 and 2004. The CD-ROM will be available at the conference to conference registrants for $30 USD, and will be available after the conference through the INCE/USA page at the Atlas Bookstore for $70 USD. To obtain a list of proceedings and other publications available now, go to www.atlasbooks.com/mktplc/00726.htm.

INCE STUDENT PAPER AWARDS

Please follow instructions on
www.noisecon2005.org for abstract and paper submission. Criteria for eligibility are given in the appendices in the abstract submission guideline files on this web site.


TUTORIAL LECTURE ON
DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING IN BIOMEDICAL ULTRASOUND

A tutorial presentation on Diagnostic Imaging in Biomedical Ultrasound will be given by E. Carr Everbach on Monday, 17 October at 7:00 p.m.

ABSTRACT

Since World War II, ultrasonic imaging has evolved from its sonar origins to include techniques borrowed from MRI, image processing, and computer modeling. Although diagnostic ultrasound techniques make increasing use of second-order physics such as tissue nonlinearity, much potentially useful information remains unexploited. In addition, safety and health concerns must be balanced against clinical usefulness.

The tutorial will review the fundamental concepts and practices of diagnostic ultrasound imaging, and describe current research efforts underway to extend this modality into new areas.

LECTURE NOTES

Lecture notes will be available at the meeting in limited supply. Those who register by 26 September are guaranteed receipt of a set of notes.

TUTORIAL LECTURE PREREGISTRATION

To partially defray the cost of the lecture a registration fee is charged. The fee is $15 for registration received by 12 September and $25 thereafter including on-site registration at the meeting. The fee for students with current ID cards is $7.00 for registration received by 12 September and $12.00 thereafter, including on-site registration at the meeting. To register use the
registration form or register online at http://asa.aip.org.


SHORT COURSE ON
STATISTICAL ENERGY ANALYSIS

INTRODUCTION

Predicting the transmission of noise and vibration through practical structures of engineering interest, across a broad frequency range, presents a number of challenges to an analyst. At low frequencies, the response of a system is typically dominated by a small number of modes; standard analysis methods based on finite elements, boundary elements and infinite elements typically provide an accurate description of the response. At higher frequencies, such methods are seldom practical. The reasons are twofold. Firstly, the number of degrees of freedom required to describe the response becomes intractable at higher frequencies. For example, a 2 m section of a typical wide-body commercial aircraft fuselage has approximately 400,000 structural modes and 8 million interior acoustic modes below 10 kHz; a typical automotive minivan has approximately 150,000 structural modes and 1 million interior acoustic modes across the same frequency range. Despite recent advances in computational efficiency, current deterministic models are typically restricted to problems involving no more than a few thousand modes. The second, more fundamental problem, however, is that the higher order modes of a system tend to be particularly sensitive to small perturbations in the properties of the system. Small uncertainties in the geometry, material properties and boundary conditions of a system can lead to large uncertainties in the dynamic response. A statistical description of a system becomes essential in order to draw meaningful conclusions about the response.

Such problems led to the development of ‘Statistical Energy Analysis' (SEA) in the early 1960s. Broadly speaking, SEA represents a field of study in which statistical descriptions of a system are adopted in order to simplify the analysis of complicated structural-acoustic problems. The past forty years have seen significant advances in the method, (both in terms of the underlying theory and in the estimation of the parameters used in an SEA model) and improvements are still being actively researched and developed. Today, SEA is used routinely in virtually every industry for which noise and vibration are of concern. Applications include: the prediction of automobile and aircraft interior noise, the design of poro-elastic ‘sound packages' and noise control treatments, the specification of dynamic environments for launch vehicles and satellites, the design of quiet consumer appliances and the acoustic design of ships, submarines and buildings.

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this course is to provide an overview of modern predictive SEA methods. The course will discuss the physics of high frequency noise and vibration transmission from both modal and wave viewpoints. The derivation of the underlying SEA equations will be discussed and the parameters used in an SEA model will be summarized. Particular emphasis will be placed on the theoretical aspects of the wave approach to SEA; the physics of wave propagation in commonly encountered structural and acoustic subsystems will therefore be discussed in detail. The calculation of the parameters that govern vibro-acoustic energy input, storage, transmission and dissipation will be discussed. Typical SEA applications will be reviewed along with areas of current research.

INSTRUCTOR

The instructor is Phil Shorter from ESI US R&D. Phil has primary responsibility for the maintenance and development of the theory implemented in the commercial SEA code AutoSEA2.

PROGRAM
Sunday, 16 October 2005, 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Monday, 17 October 2005, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

TOPICS

Introduction
Systems of interest
The source-path-receiver model
The physics of high frequency noise and vibration transmission
Uncertainty and incoherence at higher frequencies
Analogies with room acoustics and statistical mechanics
Conservation of energy and the SEA power balance equations
Overview of SEA
Historical development

The SEA parameters
Energy storage
Wave propagation in solids, fluids and poroelastic materials
1D wave propagation : (beams and ducts)
Wavelength, wavenumber and dispersion
2D wave propagation : (plates and shells)
The effects of lamination (sandwiches and composites)
The effects of curvature (singly and doubly curved shells)
Complicating effects (pressurization, fluid loading, ribs)
3D wave propagation : (acoustic cavities)
Group velocity, dispersion and modal density

Energy transmission
Direct and reverberant fields and coupling loss factors
Coupling loss factors for point connections
Coupling loss factors for line connections
Coupling loss factors for area connections
Acoustic radiation from a modal viewpoint
Acoustic radiation from a wave viewpoint
The radiation efficiency of plates and shells
Non-resonant transmission (indirect CLFs)
Transfer matrix theory and the insertion loss of a noise control treatment
Leaks and aperture effects

Energy input and dissipation
Direct field impedance and input power
Random distributed pressure loads (diffuse acoustic fields, propagating wavefields, Turbulent Boundary Layers)
Energy constraints
Damping loss factors and damping treatments

Typical applications and current research topics
Typical applications and SEA models
Response variance
The mid-frequency problem
REGISTRATION

The registration fee is $250.00 and covers attendance, instructional materials and coffee breaks. The number of attendees will be limited so please register early to avoid disappointment. Only those who have registered by 26 September will be guaranteed receipt of instructional materials. There will be a $50.00 discount for registration made prior to 12 September. Full refunds will be made for cancellations prior to 12 September. Any cancellation after 12 September will be charged a $25.00 processing fee. To register, use the
registration form or online at .


SPECIAL MEETING FEATURES

STUDENT TRANSPORTATION SUBSIDIES

A student transportation subsidies fund has been established to provide limited funds to students to partially defray transportation expenses to meetings. Students presenting papers who propose to travel in groups using economical ground transportation will be given first priority to receive subsidies, although these conditions are not mandatory. No reimbursement is intended for the cost of food or housing. The amount granted each student depends on the number of requests received. To apply for a subsidy, submit a proposal (e-mail preferred) to be received by 12 September to: Jolene Ehl, ASA, Suite 1NO1, 2 Huntington Quadrangle, Melville, NY 11747-4502, Tel: 516-576-2359, Fax: 516-576-2377, E-mail:
jehl@aip.org. The proposal should include your status as a student; whether you have submitted an abstract; whether you are a member of ASA; method of travel; if traveling by auto; whether you will travel alone or with other students; names of those traveling with you; and approximate cost of transportation.

YOUNG INVESTIGATOR TRAVEL GRANT

The Committee on Women in Acoustics is sponsoring a Young Investigator Travel Grant to help with travel costs associated with presenting a paper at the Minneapolis meeting. This award is designed for young professionals who have completed the doctorate in the past five years (not currently enrolled as a student), who plan to present a paper at the Minneapolis meeting. Each award will be of the order of $300. It is anticipated that the Committee will grant a maximum of three awards. Applicants should submit a request for support, a copy of the abstract they have submitted for the meeting and a current resume/vita which provides information on their involvement in the field of acoustics and to the ASA to: Dr. Peggy Nelson, Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, University of Minnesota, 164 Pillsbury Drive SE, Minneapolis MN 55455; Fax: 612-624-7586., E-mail:
nelso477@umn.edu. Deadline for receipt of applications is 2 September.

STUDENTS MEET MEMBERS FOR LUNCH

The ASA Education Committee provides a way for a student to meet one-on-one with a member of the Acoustical Society over lunch. The purpose is to make it easier for students to meet and interact with members at ASA Meetings. Each lunch pairing is arranged separately. Students who wish to participate should contact David Blackstock, University of Texas at Austin, through email
dtb@mail.utexas.edu or telephone 512-343-8248 (alternative number 512-835-3374). Please give Dr. Blackstock your name, university, department, degree you are seeking (BS, MS, or PhD), research field, acoustical interests, and days you are free for lunch. The sign-up deadline is ten days before the start of the Meeting, but an earlier sign-up is strongly encouraged. Each participant pays for his/her own meal.

PLENARY SESSIONS, AWARDS CEREMONY, FELLOWS' LUNCH AND SOCIAL EVENTS

Buffet socials with cash bar will be held on Tuesday and Thursday evenings at the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel.

The ASA Plenary session will be held on Wednesday afternoon, 19 October, at the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel where Society awards will be presented and recognition of newly-elected Fellows will be announced.

The NOISE-CON 2005 plenary sessions will take place on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday mornings.

A Fellows' Luncheon will be held on Thursday, 20 October, at 12:00 noon. This luncheon is open to all attendees and their guests. To register for the Fellows' Luncheon, use the
registration form online at .

WOMEN IN ACOUSTICS LUNCHEON

The Women in Acoustics luncheon will be held on Wednesday, 19 October. Those who wish to attend this luncheon should register using the
registration form or online at . The fee is $15 (students $5) for preregistration by 12 September and $20 (students $5) thereafter including on-site registration at the meeting.

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TRANSPORTATION AND HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS

AIR TRANSPORTATION

Minneapolis is served by the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport (Airport Code MSP). A number of airlines serve Minneapolis including Northwest, SunCountry, and many others. Most flights arrive at the Lindbergh (main) terminal; SunCountry and other charter flights arrive at the smaller Humphrey terminal. Transportation between terminals is free and convenient. For flight information, visit
http://www.mspairport.com/, other information of interest, visit .

GROUND TRANSPORTATION

Transportation from the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport to the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel:

Ground Transportation Information. The Tram Level information booth is staffed seven days a week from 7 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Staff provides information, directions and other assistance to travelers. Travelers may also obtain wheelchairs from the information booth.

Light Rail Service at MSP. Light rail service to and from the airport is now available. The light rail stop closest to the hotel is the Nicollet Mall stop. Exit the train at 5th and Marquette. The hotel is 5 blocks south, at 10th and Marquette.

Trains stop at both the Lindbergh and Humphrey terminals and connect travelers to 15 other destinations, including downtown Minneapolis to the north and the Mall of America to the south. Trains run between the terminals every 7 to 8 minutes during peak hours and every 10 to 15 minutes at other times of the day.

There is no charge for light rail travel between Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport's two terminals. Fares for travel to other locations from the airport are $1.75 during rush hours (Monday through Friday, 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.) and $1.25 at other times. A six-hour pass is available for $3 and an unlimited-ride day pass for $6. Tickets are sold at vending kiosks at the rail stations. For more information, visit the Metropolitan Council's Web site, .

The Lindbergh Terminal Light Rail station entrance is located near the Transit Center, between the Blue and Red Parking ramps. From the Lindbergh Terminal tram level, (two floors below the Ticketing Lobby), take the automated Hub Tram toward the Transit Center. When you exit the tram, follow the signs to the light rail station, located 70 feet underground.

The Humphrey Terminal Light Rail station is located outside of the terminal building. A covered walkway connects the station located at 34th Avenue and 72nd Street, to the Humphrey parking facility, and to the terminal building.

Major car rental companies. Rental car companies have phones and touch screen information kiosks at the Lindbergh Terminal on the Baggage Claim Level opposite baggage carousels 2, 5 and 10. The rental car counters are located in the Hub building located between the Blue and Red parking ramps, on Levels 1-3. Passengers can take the underground tram to go between the Lindbergh Terminal and the Hub building.

Parking at Hilton Minneapolis. The hotel self parking rate is $12 per day; valet parking rate is $20 per day.

SuperShuttle shared-ride, door-to-door service. Travelers wishing to take a taxi or a van to various cities in Minnesota can gain access to those services through the Lindbergh Terminal's Tram Level.

Metro Transit bus service to the Twin Cities metropolitan area and Jefferson Lines scheduled bus service are both accessible at the airport's new Transit Center. You can reach the Transit Center from the Red and Blue parking ramps or by taking the Hub Tram from the Lindbergh Terminal's Tram Level. For a complete list of shuttle companies, visit
http://www.mspairport.com/MSP/Travelers_Guide/.

Taxicabs and limousines. Taxis are available at the Lindbergh and Humphrey Terminals. Taxi service at the Lindbergh Terminal is accessible via the Tram Level. Signs direct passengers one level up to the cab starter booth, where airport staff will assist passengers obtaining a taxi. At the Humphrey Terminal, taxi service is available at the Humphrey Ground Transportation Center which is located in the Humphrey Parking ramp on Level 1.

Downtown Minneapolis is approximately 16 miles from the airport, with fares averaging $25.00. All cab fares are metered and include a $2.25 trip fee which allows drivers to recoup airport permit fees.

HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS

The meeting and all functions will be held at the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel. Please make your reservations directly with the hotel and ask for one of the rooms being held for the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). The reservation cut-off date for the special discounted ASA rates is 16 September 2005; after this date, the conference rate will no longer be available.

A block of guest rooms at discounted rates has been reserved for meeting participants at the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel. Early reservations are strongly recommended. Note that the special ASA meeting rates are not guaranteed after 16 September 2005. You must mention the Acoustical Society of America when making your reservations to obtain the special ASA meeting rates.

HILTON MINNEAPOLIS HOTEL

The Hilton Minneapolis Hotel is located in the heart of downtown.

The hotel features a fully equipped health club, indoor heated swimming pool, sauna, jacuzzi as well as a full service business center. For more details visit:
http://www.hilton.com/en/hi/hotels/index.jhtml?ctyhocn=MSPMHHH

Please make your reservation directly with the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel. When making your reservation, you must mention the Acoustical Society of America to obtain the special ASA meeting rates.

Hilton Minneapolis Hotel
1001 Marquette Avenue
Minneapolis, MN 55403
Tel: 612-376-1000; Toll Free: 1-800-445-8667
Fax: 612-397-4871

Online reservations: The convention code for the meeting is ACS.
http://www.hilton.com/en/hi/hotels/index.jhtml?ctyhocn=MSPMHHH

Rates
Single/Double: $134.00
Executive Level: $169.00

ROOM SHARING

ASA will compile a list of those who wish to share an hotel room and its cost. To be listed, send your name, telephone number, e-mail address, gender, smoker or nonsmoker preference, by 12 September to the Acoustical Society of America, preferably by e-mail:
asa@aip.org or by postal mail to Acoustical Society of America, Attn.: Room Sharing, Suite 1NO1, 2 Huntington Quadrangle, Melville, NY 11747-4502. The responsibility for completing any arrangements for room sharing rests solely with the participating individuals.

WEATHER

October is one of the most beautiful months in Minneapolis, when the air begins to get crisp. Enjoy fall colors and outdoor activities by packing a windbreaker, umbrella, and hat. A walk along Riverfront District should provide a glimpse of fall color. Even if the worst happens and winter arrives early, most attractions in downtown Minneapolis are accessible through the indoor skyway system. Average high temperatures in mid-October hover a bit below 60 degrees, with average lows around 40 degrees F. For additional information on Twin Cities weather, visit:
http://climate.umn.edu/doc/twin_cities/twin_cities.htm.

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GENERAL INFORMATION

COMMITTEE MEETINGS

Meetings of Administrative, Technical and Standards Committees, including Working Groups, will be announced in the printed program if requests are received not later than 6 June 2005. Requests for meeting space, special luncheons, etc., should be made as early as possible to: Julie Golias, Dept. of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, Univ. of Minnesota, 164 Pillsbury Drive, SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455; Fax: (612) 624-7586;
golia001@umn.edu

Requests should be made by postal mail, fax or e-mail and should specify the committee's needs for space, room arrangement, furnishings, catering, and any special equipment. Requesters should note that space is limited, and that late requests can be filled only on a space-available basis.

ASSISTIVE LISTENING DEVICES

Anyone planning to attend the meeting who will require the use of an assistive listening device, is requested to advise the Society in advance of the meeting: Acoustical Society of America, Suite 1NO1, 2 Huntington Quadrangle, Melville, NY 11747-4502,
asa@aip.org.

ACCOMPANYING PERSONS PROGRAM

Spouses and other visitors are welcome at the Minneapolis meeting. The registration fee for accompanying persons is $50. A hospitality room for accompanying persons will be open at the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. each morning throughout the meeting where information about activities in and around Minneapolis will be provided.

Minneapolis and the Twin Cities area is well known as an important diverse cultural center, offering outstanding arts programs including opera, museums and theater. A few of these are highlighted here. Other guides to area attractions will be available on site.

Downtown Minneapolis is home to several areas of interest for visitors. All are within walking distance of the meeting. The Central Business District, downtown's business core, is the heart of the dining and shopping scene. Nicollet Mall – a pedestrian-only thoroughfare – is lined with great restaurants, plus numerous upscale shops and department stores. The Warehouse District is the center of Minneapolis nightlife. This large area of renovated warehouses is home to bars, clubs, alternative theaters, art galleries and more. The Riverfront District is where Minneapolis got its start. In the Mississippi Riverfront District, attendees can stroll cobblestone streets, dine at a century-old pub, visit historical attractions and squeeze in some trendy nightlife at the same time. The Theatre District is packed with broadway shows, music venues and upscale dining. It's also home to some of Minneapolis' most recognizable productions, along with locally-produced gems.

The Guthrie Theater is the area's premier theater, and is easily accessible from the Hilton Hotel. Theater offerings for October were not available at press time, but can be found at
www.guthrietheater.org.

The world-famous Walker Art Center is one of the most celebrated art museums in the country, and is known for commissioning and presenting innovative contemporary art. A new 17-acre urban campus will open in spring 2005. The design for the new Walker engages the surrounding neighborhood with a new four-acre park as well as vistas onto the downtown Minneapolis skyline. The expanded facility, nearly double the size of the existing building, will feature new galleries; education areas; a new 385-seat theater; street-level and roof-top terraces; plazas, gardens, and lounges; and increased services and amenities for visitors. The Minneapolis Sculpture Garden, a project of the Walker Art Center and the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board, is adjacent to the museum. For more information, visit www.walkerart.org.

The Mall of America is one of a kind. It is the nation's largest retail and entertainment complex. The 11.6-mile Hiawatha Corridor Light Rail Transit links three of the region's most popular destinations, Downtown Minneapolis, Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport and Mall of America. Passengers arrive and depart at the newly remodeled Transit Station under the Mall at 24th Avenue. For more information, visit www.mallofamerica.com.

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REGISTRATION INFORMATION

The registration desk at the meeting will open on Monday, 17 October at the Hilton Minneapolis Hotel. To register use the
registration form or register online at http://asa.aip.org. If your registration is not received at the ASA headquarters by 26 September you must register on-site.

Registration fees are as follows:

                           		Preregistration  	Registration
					by			after
Category                   		16 September		16 September 

ASA or INCE Members            	  	$325                	$375      

ASA or INCE Members One-Day    		$165                	$195

Nonmembers                    		$375                	$425

Nonmembers One-Day            		$190                	$215

Nonmember Invited Speakers    		$0                  	$0

ASA Student Members
with current ID cards)        		$0                  	$0

Student Nonmembers            		$40			$40
(with current ID cards)

Emeritus members of ASA       		$50            	   	$50      
(Emeritus status pre-approved by ASA)

Accompanying Persons          		$50                 	$50
(Spouses and other registrants who 
will not participate in the technical 
sessions)

Nonmembers who simultaneously apply for Associate Membership in the Acoustical Society of America will be given a $50 discount off their dues payment for the first year (2006) of membership. Invited speakers who are members of the Acoustical Society of America are expected to pay the registration fee, but nonmember invited speakers may register without charge.

NOTE: A $25 PROCESSING FEE WILL BE CHARGED TO THOSE WHO WISH TO CANCEL THEIR REGISTRATION AFTER 12 SEPTEMBER.

ONLINE REGISTRATION

Online registration is now available at asa.aip.org.

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NOISE-CON 2005 CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS CDROM

The proceedings of NOISE-CON 2005 will be published on a CD-ROM and will be available for purchase at the conference for $30. The CD-ROM proceedings is not including with registration.


WORLD WIDE WEB MEETING ABSTRACT SUBMISSION PROCEDURES

Instructions for the preparation and submission of abstracts on the World Wide Web are provided online.

For abstracts of papers that will appear in NOISE-CON 2005 proceedings use the instructions at
www.noisecon2005.org.

Acknowledgment that your abstract has been accepted into the database will be issued online automatically in the form of a "Resubmission number" and PIN. PLEASE NOTE THAT UNTIL THESE HAVE BEEN ISSUED YOUR ABSTRACT HAS NOT BEEN ENTERED INTO THE DATABASE.

1. Web Abstract Submission Procedure is accessed on ASA Home Page at http://asa.aip.org/

2. Click on "Submit Abstract for the Vancouver meeting" from the main page

3. Enter Password: Minneapolis

4. Next screen will ask you to indicate whether you are submitting a new abstract, wish to view a previously submitted abstract without making any changes or edit a previously submitted abstract.

5. When "New Abstract" is selected, the next screen will contain instructions for selecting the format in which to prepare your abstract, i.e., either straight text or LaTeX. Straight text should be used for abstracts that do not contain any special characters or fonts such as bold, italics, etc. LaTeX should be used for abstracts that contain boldface, italics, speech symbols or mathematical expressions. Select format and click Continue.

6. The next screen will contain a blank template for entering abstract text, author information and other data needed to submit abstract, e.g., Technical Area, presentation format, etc. Online help and an example of a completed template are available from this screen.

7. After completing all REQUIRED and OPTIONAL sections of the template, click Continue. Your abstract will then be processed by a program to detect errors.

8. If the abstract is free of errors, the next screen titled "Good Abstract" will confirm the absence of errors and will display the abstract as it will appear in the printed program. Also shown will be the author contact information. You will be asked to either submit the abstract as it appears or whether you wish to make changes before final submission. If you wish to make changes prior to final abstract submission, the template containing your abstract will be returned to the screen.

9. If the abstract contains errors, a screen is displayed describing the error and giving the approximate line number where the error appears in the LaTeX source file for your abstract. You can either return immediately to the template and fix the error if you know its location or view the LaTeX source document to locate the line on which the error appears. Each line in the source document is numbered for easy location of errors. After locating the errors return to the template to make corrections and resume the submission process.

10. When you are ready for final submission of the abstract, the next screen will contain the Resubmission number and PIN for your submission. This is your acknowledgment that the abstract has been entered into the database. Please retain this number should you wish to view or edit this abstract at a later time (prior to the deadline date). Note that a Resubmission Number and PIN will be issued for each new abstract or resubmission of a previously submitted abstract.

11. If you wish to view a previously submitted abstract without making any changes, select "view only." The next screen will ask for the Resubmission Number and PIN issued at the time you submitted the abstract originally.

When these numbers are entered, the template containing your abstract will be provided. If you do not have the Resubmission and PIN numbers, instructions on how to obtain them are given online. After viewing abstract click exit. You will not receive a new PIN and Resubmission number since you did not make any changes to your original submission.

12. If you wish to revise and resubmit your abstract, select "Resubmission." The next screen will ask for the Resubmission Number and PIN issued at the time you submitted the abstract originally. When these numbers are entered, the template containing your abstract will be provided. If you do not have the Resubmission and PIN numbers, instructions on how to obtain them are given online.

Please remember to use the view only option if you wish to check your abstract without making any changes.

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INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PREPARATION AND SUBMISSION OF ELECTRONIC ABSTRACTS

For abstracts of papers that will appear in NOISE-CON 2005 proceedings use the instructions at .For abstracts of papers that will appear in NOISE-CON 2005 proceedings use the instructions at www.noisecon2005.org.

1. An abstract must be submitted for each meeting paper. The deadline date for receipt of abstracts is Monday, 6 June 2005. The email address to which your abstract should be submitted will be given at the bottom of the template used for submissions. You will receive email acknowledgment of receipt of your abstract and separate follow-up if there are problems with your submission.

2. Do not transmit duplicate submissions of the same abstract. If you do not receive emailacknowledgment of receipt of your abstract, send a message to asa@aip.org to determine whether your submission was received. If you wish to submit a revised abstract, enter the number of your original submission (i.e., the asae number) in the braces following \resubmission.

3. The files needed for electronic submission may be obtained via ftp or email as described below. Do not use older versions of these files; you should retrieve the latest version. You will receive five separate files. First read the file named readme.asa and carefully follow the instructions contained therein. Also included will be an empty template (including the return email submission address), a completed sample, and files containing other instructions. A completed sample is shown on the next page. For further information or questions, email asa@aip.org.

a. Anonymous ftp. Use ftp to open ftp.aip.org, log in as "anonymous" and give your email address as a password. Move to the directory /ems/tex../macros/asaabs and get all the files in that directory.

b. Email. Send a message to listserv@listserv.aip.org with the body of the message consisting of just the line
GET asaabs PACKAGE

The files will be emailed back to you with the filename for each message in the first line of the body of the message. Delete the e-mail headers (and the line that gives you the name of the file) and save each message using the correct filename given on the first line in the body of the file.

4. Avoid the following common errors: a) inserting line breaks in a line after the comment character, i.e., %; b) deleting the third pair of braces in the \author command, putting your full name in the first pair of braces, or using only one \author command for more than one author; c) submitting compressed or encoded abstracts or sending abstracts as an attachment; d) unbalanced braces or unmatched math delimiters; e) leaving blank lines in the abstract or \affil input; f) including more than one abstract in a single email submission; g) inputting & or % when meaning to produce the symbols "&" or "%" (\& and \% should be used); h) misspelling \affil as \afill; I) adding header or tailer information to the template; j) not filling in all "REQUIRED" commands.

5. Use passives instead of pronouns "I" and "we," e.g., "It was noted" instead of "We noted." Avoid use of non-standard abbreviations in abstract title. For example, use dB or Hz but avoid use of abbreviations which are not used across many technical areas such as HRTF, NDE, etc.

6. Limit abstract to 200 words. Count each word in the body of the abstract but do not count title or authors' names and addresses. Displayed equations that are set apart from the text count as 40 words. The Program Organizing Committee has the option to alter abstracts to bring them into compliance with the 200-word limit.

7. Do not use footnotes for references or acknowledgments. References or acknowledgments should be set within square brackets. Reference should be in standard JASA format, viz., in the sequence: authors, abbreviated journal name, volume number, first and last page numbers, and year. Only set footnotes for present addresses, use \thanks to set such footnotes and they will appear at the end of the abstract.

8. Provide the following information in the correct places in the template:

a. Complete mailing address for the corresponding author, i.e., the author who should receive the acceptance notice.

b. Authors' names, affiliations and addresses. One email address will be included in the printed program for each abstract. This should be entered immediately after the mailing address for the author whose email address is to be listed.

c. Number of words in the body of the abstract. Indicate number of words in the abstract in the braces following \numberwords.

d. If the paper is intended for a special session, indicate the session in the braces following \specialsession. If invited, state "Invited." For example, \specialsession{Invited, Loudness and Perception}.

e. Choose and list the Technical Committee most nearly coinciding with the subject matter of the paper in the braces following \technicalarea. Current Technical Committees are: Acoustical Oceanography, Animal Bioacoustics, Architectural Acoustics, Biomedical Ultrasound/Bioresponse to Vibration, Engineering Acoustics, Musical Acoustics, Noise, Physical Acoustics, Psychological and Physiological Acoustics, Signal Processing in Acoustics, Speech Communication, Structural Acoustics and Vibration and Underwater Acoustics.

f. Describe special equipment desired for the presentation other than a PC computer with audio playback capability and projector, overhead projector or laser pointer. Note that facilities for 35 mm slide projection, VCR's and monitors or dual slide and/or overhead projection are considered special equipment. Refer to the section on Special Equipment for further details.

g. Indicate a preference (if any) for lecture or poster presentation. If only a lecture presentation is desired, state "Lecture Only," in which case the paper may not be accepted if time is not available. Contributed papers in Speech Communication are encouraged to be submitted for poster presentation.

h. List one complete PACS subject classification number including letters (for example, 43.28.Ae) under which the abstract should be identified in the braces following PACS (see the list, in a recent June or December issue of JASA or via ftp in the /PACS directory of ftp.aip.org)

i. If you wish to have your paper included in the best paper award competitions as described, insert the desired technical area of paper award competition in the braces following \paperaward.

m. Certify that you have complied with the Ethical Principles of the Acoustical Society of America for Research Involving Human and Non-Human Animals in Research and Publishing and Presentations by entering "I have complied with ASA Ethical Principles" in the braces following \hasubjects..

Shown on the next page is an example of a template file that has been filled in for electronic Submission (refer to the printed call for papers where you will find the sections to be inserted by authors highlighted in yellow).

SAMPLE ELECTRONIC ABSTRACT

%Sample submitted abstract for the meeting.
% Everything after a percent sign is ignored in the submission; it is treated as a comment.
\documentstyle[11pt,pasaabs]{article}
\nofiles
% PLEASE LEAVE THE FOLLOWING COMMANDS ALONE; don't change them at all. They will be determined by the ASA Program Organizing Committee
% and are required by the ASA Program typesetting translation software.
\aipid{ } % AIP id for SPIN database entry
\time{ } % Time of presentation
\abstractid{ } % The abstract identifier as it will appear in print
% Except for the abstract text, information should be entered between the curly braces { }. Optional comments that are now commented (follow a ''%''
% should be uncommented (delete the ''%'' sign) before use. You may return to a new line when entering long information (e.g., an affiliation). Please refer
% to the separate instructions if you have any questions (e.g., how to enter accent marks, mathematical symbols, bold face, etc.).
%
% Here is the information for the corresponding author. This information is used for contact only, it is NOT used for publication purposes.
\correspondingauthor{I.J. Knox} % REQUIRED
\correspondingaddress{2322 Harvardshire Path, Cambridge, MA 02122}
\correspondingphone{202-328-2010} % REQUIRED,
\correspondingemail{knox@icarus.bu.edu} % REQUIRED
\correspondingfax{202-555-1234} % OPTIONAL

\begin{document}

% Enter the title here. It should be initial capital only.
\title{Binaural loudness summation for tones and noise}

% For each institution enter one or more \author commands, then enter the \affil command. Just cut and paste the commands (either \author or \affil), and
% fill in, for more author(s) and affiliations. For each author, enter the first name and middle initial in the first braces; last name in middle braces; and Jr.,
% III, etc. in the last braces. Leave braces empty as needed. One email address will be included for each paper in the printed program. The address should be inserted immediately after the mailing address for the author whose email address is to be listed.
%
% REQUIRED, enter author(s) here as first name and middle initial, last name, and other (e.g., Jr.):
\author{Albert B.}{Jones}{Jr.}
% REQUIRED, for preceding author(s). Use standard abbreviations.
\affil{Dept. of Psychology, Northeastern Univ., 1600 Massachusetts Ave., Boston, MA 02115, abjones@ne.edu}
\author{Irene J.}{Knox}{ }
\author{William F.}{Kinoo}{ }
\affil{Dept. of Psychology, Boston Univ., Boston, MA 02115}
%Use passives instead of pronouns "I" and "we," e.g., "It was noted" instead of "We noted."
% INSERT THE ABSTRACT, INCLUDING THE OPTIONAL ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF SUPPORT, BETWEEN THE LINES "\begin{abstract}" and
% "\end{abstract}".

\begin{abstract}
The relation between binaural and monaural loudness was measured by magnitude estimation for a $\lambda=1000$-Hz tone and for band-limited white noise. Four types of stimuli---monaural and binaural tone, monaural and binaural . . .
perfectly with earlier results [D.E. McGee and I.J. Knox, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. {\bf 57}, 55--62 (1975)] from a {\it different} group of subjects who made loudness matches between binaural and monaural stimuli. [Work supported by NSF.] \end{abstract}

% REQUIRED. Insert the number of words (not to exceed 200) in the abstract, including text of abstract and acknowledgment of support, but not including authors and title:
\numberwords{187}
% If this abstract is for a special session, insert title of session here. If invited, state "Invited."
\specialsession{Invited, Loudness and Perception}
% REQUIRED. Insert the suggested technical area:
\technicalarea{Psychological and Physiological Acoustics}
% OPTIONAL. Fill in special equipment here; only PC computers with audio playback capability and projectors, overhead projectors and laser pointers are standard equipment. Refer to A/V section for further information.
\specialequipment{VCR and monitor}
% OPTIONAL. List your preferred method of presentation:
\preferredmethod{Prefer lecture but willing to give as a poster}
%REQUIRED. List one complete PACS subject classification number including letters (for example, 43.28.Ae) under which the abstract should be classified (see PACS list online at http://asa.aip.org/jasa.html, in a recent June or December issue of JASA, or via ftp in the
/PACS directory of ftp.aip.org)
\PACS {43.66.Cb}
% OPTIONAL. List technical area of best paper award competition you wish to enter \paperaward{P&P}
%OPTIONAL. Certify that you have complied with the Ethical Principles of the Acoustical Society of America for Research Involving Human and Non-Human Animals in Research and Publishing and Presentations by entering "I have complied with ASA Ethical Principles"
\hasubjects{I have complied with ASA Ethical Principles}
% OPTIONAL. To submit a revised abstract, enter the number of your original submission. For example, \resubmission{asae44}.
\resubmission{ }
\end{document}

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INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PREPARATION OF PAPER-COPY ABSTRACTS FOR PAPERS TO BE PRESENTED AT MEETINGS OF THE ACOUSTICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA

For abstracts of papers that will appear in NOISE-CON 2005 proceedings use the instructions at www.noisecon2005.org.

1. For each meeting paper, one copy of a typed or printed abstract should be sent to the Technical Program Chair of the meeting in time to be received by Monday, 6 June 2005. Allow at least 5 days for delivery within the U.S., and longer from other countries. The Chair's address can be found in the "Abstract Submission Guidelines" section of this Call for Papers. If the paper has been invited for a special session, another copy of the abstract should be sent to the session organizer at least a week before the deadline. Telefaxed abstracts will not be accepted. A cover letter is not necessary.

2. Limit abstract to 200 words. Count each word in the body of the abstract but do not count title or authors' names and addresses. Indicate number of words in the abstract at the bottom of the sheet. Displayed equations that are set apart from the text count as 40 words. The Program Organizing Committee has the option to alter abstracts to bring them into compliance with the 200-word limit.

3. Use the format shown in the sample abstract. The paper title and author's name, affiliation, and address should be in a heading set apart from the abstract text. The author's affiliation and address should be set within parentheses, and should be sufficiently complete to ensure delivery of the acceptance notice. If there is more than one author, give the complete address for the author who is to receive the notice. For each of the other authors, give one complete address. One email address will be included in the printed program for each abstract. This should appear immediately after the mailing address for the author whose email address is to be listed.

4. The entire abstract, consisting of the heading, text and the information requested in Section 9 below, must fit on one side of an 8½ x 11-in. or A-4 sheet of paper. The heading and text should be typed or printed double spaced (3 lines/inch), with 10 or 12-point font; but the information requested in Section 9 may be single spaced.

5. Do not use footnotes. References and acknowledgments should be set within square brackets. References should be in standard JASA format, viz., in the sequence: authors, abbreviated journal name, volume number, first and last page numbers, and year.

6. Underline nothing except what is to be italicized.

7. Use passives instead of pronouns "I" and "we," e.g., "It was noted" instead of "We noted." Avoid use of non-standard abbreviations in abstract title. For example, use dB or Hz but avoid use of abbreviations which are not used across many technical areas such as HRTF, NDE, etc.

8. If the letter "I" appears as a symbol, loop the letter by hand to form a long-hand l and write "lc ell" in the margin, so as to distinguish it from the number one. If the letter "O" may be confused with the number zero, write "cap oh" in the margin. Identify phonetic symbols by appropriate marginal notes.

9. Give the following information at the bottom of the abstract, as in the sample:

a. Indicate the number of words in the body of the abstract (see item 2 above)

b. If the paper is intended for a special session, indicate the session title. If invited, state "Invited."

c. Choose and list the Technical Committee most nearly coinciding with the subject matter of the paper. Current Technical Committees are: Acoustical Oceanography, Animal Bioacoustics, Architectural Acoustics, Biomedical Ultrasound/Bioresponse to Vibration, Engineering Acoustics, Musical Acoustics, Noise, Physical Acoustics, Psychological and Physiological Acoustics, Signal Processing in Acoustics, Speech Communication, Structural Acoustics and Vibration and Underwater Acoustics.

d. The name, telephone and telefax numbers (with country and city codes if outside the U.S.) and email address of the author to be contacted for information. Notices and other correspondence will be sent to the author who is listed as the first author in the heading unless stated otherwise at the bottom of the abstract.

e. Describe special equipment desired for the presentation other than a PC computer with audio playback capability and projector, overhead projector or laser pointer. Note that facilities for 35mm slide projectors, VCR's and monitors or dual slide and/or overhead projection are considered special equipment. See the section on audio visual equipment for further details.

f. Indicate a preference (if any) for lecture or poster presentation. If only a lecture presentation is desired, state "Lecture Only," in which case the paper may not be accepted if time is not available. Contributed papers in Speech Communication are encouraged to be submitted for poster presentation.

g. List one complete PACS subject classification number including letters (for example, 43.28.Ae) under which the abstract should be indexed in the braces following PACS (see the "PACS list, in a recent June or December issue of JASA or via ftp in the /PACS directory of ftp.aip.org)

h. If you want to enter your paper in one of the available Best Student Paper Award competitions.

i. Certify that you have complied with the that you have complied with the Ethical Principles of the Acoustical Society of America for Research Involving Human and Non-Human Animals in Research and Publishing and Presentations by entering the following statement: "I have complied with ASA Ethical Principles"

SAMPLE ABSTRACT

Binaural loudness summation for tones and noise. Albert B. Jones, Jr. (Dept. of Psychology,

Northeastern Univ., 1600 Massachusetts Ave., Boston, MA 02115, abj@server.edu) and Irene J.

Knox (Boston Univ., Boston, MA 02115) The relation between binaural and monaural loudness

was measured by magnitude stimation for a 1000-Hz tone and for band-limited white noise.

Four types of stimuli--monaural and binaural tone, monaural and binaural noise--were presented

frontally at eight sound pressure levels (SPL) in mixed randomly selected sequences. Subjects

were instructed to rate the four stimuli according to a single loudness scale. The loudness of the

monaural and binaural tones was found to be a power function of the mean square sound

pressure, with an exponent near 0.5. The loudness of the noise increased more rapidly at low

SPL than loudness of the tone; at high SPL it increased more slowly. The bow shape of the noise

function would be predicted from loudness matches between wide-band and narrow-band

stimuli. A sound perceived binaurally was 1.3 to 1.7 times louder than sound of the same SPL

perceived monaurally. Results of these direct loudness estimations agree almost perfectly with

earlier results [D.E. McGee and I.J. Knox, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 57, 55-62 (1975)] from another

group of subjects who made loudness matches between binaural and monaural stimuli. [Work

supported by NSF.]

Number of words in abstract: 187
Suggested for special session on Loudness and Perception
Technical Area: Psychological and Physiological Acoustics
Special facility: VCR and 25" color monitor
PACS Subject Classification number(s): 43.66.Cb
Method of presentation: Prefer lecture but willing to give as poster
Human/Animal Subjects: "I certify that I have complied with ASA Ethical Principles"
Student Paper Competition: P&P Telephone Number: 516-576-2360 (I. J. Knox)
FAX: 516-576-2377
Send notice to: I. J. Knox
Email: ijk@server.com

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MEMBERS OF THE 150th MEETING ORGANIZING COMMITTEE and NOISE-CON 2005 ORGANZINING COMMITTEE

150th Meeting Organizing Committee

Peggy B. Nelson, General Chair
Neal F. Viemeister, Technical Program Chair
Kay Hatlestad, Food Service/Social Events
Bruce Olson, Audio-Visual
David Braslau, Accompanying Persons Program/Technical Tours
Derrick Knight, Benjamin Munson, Signs/Publicity

Noise-Con 2005 Organizing Committee

Daniel J. Kato, General Chair
Robert J. Bernhard, Co-Chair
Patricia Davies, Technical Program Cochair
J. Stuart Bolton, Technical Program Cochair
Richard J. Peppin, Exhibition Manager

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